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Winter Flowering Plants

winter flowering plants 1
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Winter Flowering Plants

Why do some plants flower during the winter? — A better question to ask is “why do plants go dormant in the winter?”. Plants go dormant during the worst weather of the year in order to conserve their energy for better times. In certain parts of the world, winter is the best time of year to grow and flower because due to geography, that is when the rains fall. Plants that are native to these parts of the world are winter flowering plants because it makes sense to grow in the winter and avoid the hot arid summers of their native homes. So winter flowering plants are not confused, they are crafty. When you are ready to buy winter flower plants for your garden, check out our online list of winter flowering plants for sale.
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Winter Flowering Plants

Snowdrops Blooming in Snow Have you wondered what plants grow in winter? While many plants are dormant during the winter months, there are plants that can survive and even thrive in the cold. These plants provide color and beauty against a stark and sometimes dreary winter landscape. Planting a variety of these winter blooming plants will add interest to your garden until warm weather plants start blooming in the spring. Whether you prefer bulbs, bushes or trees in your garden, there are plants that will grow and provide pleasing blooms, even in the winter. Cassia Senna bicapsularis, is hardy in zones 8 through 11 and in areas where the temperature does not dip below 10 degrees Fahrenheit. Cassia may bloom as late as November and then bloom again in the spring. Snowdrops Galanthus nivalis grow well in zones 3 through 7. They are one of the earliest blooming flowers in the spring, often peeking up through the snow as early as February. They do best in well-drained soils and are well adapted to rock gardens. Camellia Camellia is hardy to zone 6. Plant in a partially shaded area where flowers can thaw out after a snow or frost without direct sunlight. Flowers will survive temperatures as low as 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Depending upon the cultivar, flowers will appear from October through March. Weeping Winter Jasmine Jasminum nudiflorum is hardy in zones 6 through 10. It will bloom beginning in November and will produce heavy blooms January through March. It may be trained along a trellis, fence line or used to fill in banks and hillsides. Witch Hazel Hamamelis x intermedia grows well in zones 4 through 8. It does best in well-drained, acidic soil. The plants may be mulched with pine bark, which will protect young plants during the summer months. Hellebores Helleborus grow well in zones 4 through 8. The flowers are available in a wide range of colors, from white to crimson. They prefer rich, moist, well-drained soils. Plant them around other shrubs in the garden to add interest and to keep the deer away. Lily of the Valley Pieris japonica thrives in zones 4 through 8. They do well in cool, dry areas and make good garden partners with rhododendrons and azaleas. Flowering Quince Chaenomeles speciosa may be planted in zones 4 through 9, depending upon the cultivar selected. The plant enjoys full sun in well-drained, non-alkaline soil. The plant will begin blooming in warmer climates as early as January. The fruit from the tree may be harvested in October and made into jelly. What Plants Grow in Winter Reticulated Iris or Iris reticulata may be planted in zones 4 through 9. Plant in full sun to partial shade in groupings or around shrubs, depending upon landscaping needs. The plants will begin blooming as early as January and continue through mid-March. Learn more about early blooming flowers in our Seasonal Spring Flowers slideshow.
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Winter Flowering Plants

Some of our favorite winter flowering plants include the curiously shaped, brightly colored, and intricately foliaged perennials: Cyclamen and Helleborus. Although their branches may be bare, the powerfully fragrant, honeycomb-like, upside-down flowers of Edgeworthia are real standouts in the garden. Usually grown for their foliage, Sarcococca plants also have small but very fragrant flowers in the winter. You southern gardeners might not consider the normally heat-intolerant Primula for the winter garden. Our garden trials have revealed a nice selection of heat tolerant varieties of this dainty and pretty winter flower plant. There are many more interesting winter flowering plants including certain species of Arum, Asarum, Aspidistra, Cardamine, Phlox, Eranthis, Eupatorium, Ipheion, Iris, Narcissus, Nothoscordum, Oxalis, Pulmonaria, Ranunculus, Trillium and Veronica.
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Have you wondered what plants grow in winter? While many plants are dormant during the winter months, there are plants that can survive and even thrive in the cold. These plants provide color and beauty against a stark and sometimes dreary winter landscape. Planting a variety of these winter blooming plants will add interest to your garden until warm weather plants start blooming in the spring. Whether you prefer bulbs, bushes or trees in your garden, there are plants that will grow and provide pleasing blooms, even in the winter.
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Snowdrops Blooming in Snow Have you wondered what plants grow in winter? While many plants are dormant during the winter months, there are plants that can survive and even thrive in the cold. These plants provide color and beauty against a stark and sometimes dreary winter landscape. Planting a variety of these winter blooming plants will add interest to your garden until warm weather plants start blooming in the spring. Whether you prefer bulbs, bushes or trees in your garden, there are plants that will grow and provide pleasing blooms, even in the winter.
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Some of these plants will flower only in winter, and others will flower in very early spring, but can still be called winter flowering plants depending on where you live. The trick is to see just what’s offering at your local nursery or online at the time you want that splash of colour. Just go out and buy what’s flowering! My Mum swears by that method. However, always check out the plants themselves. Make sure they look healthy and fresh.
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9 Winter Garden Plants That Dazzle (Even When It Snows)Hardy across many zones, these plants make terrific additions to your garden plans.If you’ve got a black thumb, flowering quince is a good choice. Virtually indestructible, flowering quince tolerates climate extremes and neglect. This deciduous thorny shrub can stretch up to 8 feet wide, makes great natural fencing, and puts on a big show of blossoms in winter. Plant in spring or fall.Image: HeatherOnHerTravels.com
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For the botanist, probably quite a lot. But for those of us who just need to know the basics, Daffodils have one large flower head per stem, and Jonquils have several smaller flowers per stem. They are both called Narcissi, belonging to the Narcissus family. Our Jonquils have been flowering for over a month in their little pot in June/July.  You’ll find them in your nursery and online now. So grab a catalogue from your favourite supplier. There are over 50 different species of Narcissi which have given us thousands of cultivars. So for winter  blooming plants, Narcissi are great for starters. Jonquils are definitely winter blooming plants, but you may also have luck with Daffodils in late winter if you live in the right place.
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Some mahonias — leatherleaf mahonia (Mahonia bealei) and selected cultivars of M. x media — bloom in winter; these shrubs are hardy in USDA Zones 7 to 9. A close relative, Oregon grape holly (M. aquifolium) flowers in early spring and is hardy to USDA 5. The ultra-fragrant flowers of many daphnes, including Daphne bholua ‘Jacqueline Postill’, appear in midwinter. ‘Jacqueline Postill’ is evergreen. USDA Zones 7 to 9. The flower buds of Pieris japonica persist from fall through winter. Give this evergreen shrub moist, well-drained, acid, organic soil. In the South, site it in shade. USDA Zones 4b to 7. The so-called Christmas rose is actually a hellebore (Helleborus niger), and for areas of the country where winter flowers are a rarity, hellebores are a delight. These long-lived perennials love shade or dappled sun and moist, organic soil; there are thousands of cultivars in a range of colors from white and cream to pink, rose, burgundy and light green. USDA Zones 4 to 8. Winter jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum) blooms in January, making it a great candidate for creating a mid-winter color splash on retaining walls and banks. Hardy in USDA Zones 6 to 10. The coppery orange flowers of ‘Jelena’ witchhazel (Hamamelis x intermedia ‘Jelena’) appear as early as January. The shrub also offers orange-red fall color. Hardy in USDA Zones 5 to 8. The red river lily, or Kaffir lily (Schizostylis coccinea) typically blooms in fall but you can still expect to see them reappear on mild days through midwinter. In the wild, these perennials occur in wet areas. USDA Zones 6 to 9. Depending on the species, witch hazels produce their spidery blooms anywhere from November to early March. ‘Jelena’, shown here, typically blooms in late January.
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Photo by Kimberly Navabpour Pinterest PagesPrevious 1 of 18 Next View All Great plants for fall and winter color Cool-season flowers bring a splash of color to your garden right when you need it most. Where freezes are infrequent, you can plant cheery pansies (pictured), snapdragons, English daisies, and more from early fall through late winter. They’ll overwinter, filling your borders, containers, and pocket gardens with months of flower power. In cold climates, plants will die off in winter but can be planted again in spring. Look for sturdy plants with good leaf color in six-packs and 4-inch containers. Click ahead for some of our favorite picks for the cool season.

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9 Photos of the "Winter Flowering Plants"

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