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When To Plant A Garden

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When To Plant A Garden

Gardening by the Moon Calendar from the Farmers’ Almanac The Farmers Almanac Gardening by the Moon Calendar is determined by our age-old formula and applies generally to regions where the climate is favorable. Because the gardening calendar is based on the phase and position of the Moon, it is consistent across all growing zones. Recommended dates are still “weather permitting,” and you should talk with your local greenhouse or agricultural extension office for the optimal window of time within which to use these dates. Farmers’ Almanac’s Gardening by the Moon Calendar is available here for 2 months and if you sign up for a FREE account with us, we’ll give you 4 months! May 20172nd-5th A barren period. Favorable for killing plant pests, cultivating, or taking a short vacation.6th-8th Favorable time for sowing hay, fodder crops, and grains. Plant flowers. Excellent time for planting corn, beans, peppers, and other aboveground crops.9th-10th Plant seedbeds. First day is excellent for planting aboveground crops, and planting leafy vegetables. Second day is a good day for transplanting. Second day is also when to plant carrots, beets, onions, turnips, and other root crops. Also good for leafy vegetables.11th-13th Seeds planted now will do poorly and yield little.14th-15th Plant late beets, potatoes, onions, carrots, and other root crops.16th-17th Kill plant pests on these barren days.18th-20th Fine for vine crops. Set strawberry plants. Good days for transplanting. Favorable time for planting late root crops.21st-22nd Poor planting. Fine for cultivating or spraying.23rd-24th Good days for transplanting. Root crops that can be planted now will yield well.25th-26th Any seed planted now will tend to rot.27th-28th Plant seedbeds and flower gardens. Most favorable for corn, cotton, okra, beans, peppers, eggplant, and other aboveground crops.29th-31st A barren period. Favorable for killing plant pests, cultivating, or taking a short vacation.June 20171st Poor period for planting. Kill plant pests, clear fencerows, or clear land.2nd-4th Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.5th-6th Plant seedbeds. Extra good for planting fall lettuce, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, and other leafy vegetables. All aboveground crops planted now will do well.7th-9th Poor planting days, cut hay or do general farm work.10th-11th Plant late beets, potatoes, onions, carrots, and other root crops.12th-14th Poor days for planting. Kill plant pests, spray, fertilize, do general farm work.15th-16th Set strawberry plants. Excellent for any vine crops such as beans, peas, and cucumbers. Good days for transplanting. Favorable time for planting late root crops.17th-18th Cut hay or do plowing on these barren days.19th-20th Good days for transplanting. Good days for planting root crops.21st-22nd Seeds planted now tend to rot in ground.23rd-24th Excellent for sowing seedbeds and flower gardens. Plant tomatoes, beans, peppers, corn, cotton, and other aboveground crops on these most fruitful days.25th-29th Poor period for planting. Kill plant pests, clear fencerows, or clear land.30th Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.July 20171st Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground. Get all 12 months of our exclusive Gardening by the Moon Calendar inside the Farmers’ Almanac (available in our online store). This calendar lists favorable and not so favorable dates for various gardening and farming chores.
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When To Plant A Garden

May 20172nd-5th A barren period. Favorable for killing plant pests, cultivating, or taking a short vacation.6th-8th Favorable time for sowing hay, fodder crops, and grains. Plant flowers. Excellent time for planting corn, beans, peppers, and other aboveground crops.9th-10th Plant seedbeds. First day is excellent for planting aboveground crops, and planting leafy vegetables. Second day is a good day for transplanting. Second day is also when to plant carrots, beets, onions, turnips, and other root crops. Also good for leafy vegetables.11th-13th Seeds planted now will do poorly and yield little.14th-15th Plant late beets, potatoes, onions, carrots, and other root crops.16th-17th Kill plant pests on these barren days.18th-20th Fine for vine crops. Set strawberry plants. Good days for transplanting. Favorable time for planting late root crops.21st-22nd Poor planting. Fine for cultivating or spraying.23rd-24th Good days for transplanting. Root crops that can be planted now will yield well.25th-26th Any seed planted now will tend to rot.27th-28th Plant seedbeds and flower gardens. Most favorable for corn, cotton, okra, beans, peppers, eggplant, and other aboveground crops.29th-31st A barren period. Favorable for killing plant pests, cultivating, or taking a short vacation.June 20171st Poor period for planting. Kill plant pests, clear fencerows, or clear land.2nd-4th Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.5th-6th Plant seedbeds. Extra good for planting fall lettuce, cabbage, cauliflower, collards, and other leafy vegetables. All aboveground crops planted now will do well.7th-9th Poor planting days, cut hay or do general farm work.10th-11th Plant late beets, potatoes, onions, carrots, and other root crops.12th-14th Poor days for planting. Kill plant pests, spray, fertilize, do general farm work.15th-16th Set strawberry plants. Excellent for any vine crops such as beans, peas, and cucumbers. Good days for transplanting. Favorable time for planting late root crops.17th-18th Cut hay or do plowing on these barren days.19th-20th Good days for transplanting. Good days for planting root crops.21st-22nd Seeds planted now tend to rot in ground.23rd-24th Excellent for sowing seedbeds and flower gardens. Plant tomatoes, beans, peppers, corn, cotton, and other aboveground crops on these most fruitful days.25th-29th Poor period for planting. Kill plant pests, clear fencerows, or clear land.30th Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground.July 20171st Sow grains and forage crops. Plant flowers. Favorable for planting peas, beans, tomatoes, and other fall crops bearing aboveground. Get all 12 months of our exclusive Gardening by the Moon Calendar inside the Farmers’ Almanac (available in our online store). This calendar lists favorable and not so favorable dates for various gardening and farming chores.
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When To Plant A Garden

Why Plant a Garden with Vegetables Starting a vegetable garden at home is an easy way to save money — that $2 tomato plant can easily provide you with 10 pounds of fruit over the course of a season. But planting a garden with vegetables also gives you the pleasure of savoring a delicious, sun-warmed tomato fresh from your backyard. In almost every case, the flavor and texture of varieties you can grow far exceed grocery store produce. Plus, growing vegetables can be fun. It’s a great way to spend time with children or have a place to get away and spend time outdoors in the sun. Learning what to plant in a garden with vegetables, and how to tend them for the best harvest, is probably easier than you think. If you plan it right, you can enjoy a beautiful garden full of the fruits of your labor, without having to spend hours and hours tending it. Planting a garden that includes vegetables and flowers means you’ve combined natural companions, and that can turn a potential eyesore into an attractive landscape feature. Read on for more tips on your first vegetable garden! Get inspired by the White House vegetable garden!
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When To Plant A Garden

Intensive Cropping This type of planting a garden with vegetables means using in wide bands, generally 1-4 feet across and as long as you like. Intensive cropping reduces the amount of area needed for paths, but the closer spacing of the plants usually means you have to weed by hand. Because of the handwork required, when thinking how to plan a vegetable garden with rows remember: It is important not to make the bands wider than you can comfortably reach. Intensive cropping also allows you to design your vegetable garden, making it a good choice, for example, if you want to grow vegetables in your front yard. It’s a great solution for mixing vegetables with ornamentals, as well. A specialized version of intensive cropping is the “square-foot method.” This system divides the garden into small beds (typically 4×4 feet), that are further subdivided into 1-foot squares. Each 1-foot square is planted with one, four, nine, or 16 plants, depending on the size of the plant when it matures. It also makes sense to leave some areas of the garden unplanted at first. This allows you to plant a second crop to harvest later in the season. Lettuce, radishes, green onions, carrots, and bush beans are commonly planted several times during the season. Don’t miss these other vegetable-garden design tips! Download our free vegetable garden plans!
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When To Plant A Garden

If the flowers are white, then the plant here in the northwest is called choke weed. First, do NOT pull the weed up! Just little tips of root can and WILL spring forth again with a new plant. You need to use a good herbicide on the plant. When I found this out, it was springing back after my vegetables had already sprouted, so I couldn’t just spray the whole plant without losing what I wanted to grow. I got an old child’s paintbrush and painted all of the leaves of the new choke weed sprouts. Make sure that it has not rained or received water for a couple of days before either spraying or painting so that it will absorb the herbicide right away and completely. If the major portion of the plant is far enough away from your garden I would spray that with a heavy dose to get down to the major roots. If the plant is originating on someone else’s property, you may have to install a deep enough barrier to prevent the roots from traveling onto your property, as they can travel some distance before springing up elsewhere.

When To Plant A Garden

When To Plant A Garden
When To Plant A Garden

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