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Water Wise Landscape

water wise landscape 1
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Water Wise Landscape

Water conservation In this section Waterwise landscaping home Planting for efficient water use Learn about plant groupings. A landscape example See waterwise landscaping in action. Search for plants and photos Find the right plants for your landscape. Frequently asked questions View commonly asked questions and answers on use of the plant database. Glossary View of list of landscaping terms. Florida Water StarSM landscaping resources See the list of resources associated with this conservation program. Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ Visit the official Florida Yards and Neighborhoods’ landscaping website. Search plant database Learn aboutwatering restrictions Waterwise landscaping helps save water resources Florida is known for its beautiful greenery, abundant sunshine and the many lakes, rivers and streams that dot the peninsula’s interior. When Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon first sailed along Florida’s east coast in 1513, he named this area of the New World for its abundance of flowers and greenery, calling the area La Florida in honor of Pascua Florida (the feast of the flowers). Centuries later, Florida still attracts new residents and visitors — at least in part — because of its floral beauty. Florida’s weather also attracts many, but the natural cycle of weather that brings rain to replenish our water sources is constantly changing. The long periods of wet weather followed by long periods of dry weather means that the water to sustain the state’s plants and animals — and us — is limited. Often, the biggest use of water by people is outdoors for lawn and landscape irrigation. To find a balance in our uses of water and the needs of nature, water conservation must be a part of people’s everyday practices. Using water wisely in our landscapes is one way to find that balance. Waterwise is a common sense way to landscape that conserves water and protects the environment. The main objective is to establish and maintain a healthy landscape by matching the right plants with existing site conditions so that the use of additional resources — such as water, fertilizer, pesticides and labor — is minimized. In addition, waterwise landscaping practices reduce the amount of pollutants reaching water bodies because fewer yard chemicals are used. Fertilizers and pesticides can contaminate waterways when they are washed out of the yard with the rain in stormwater runoff. Florida’s water management districts were established to make sure that people and nature have the water they need. We invite you to explore the information here and on the Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ website to learn how you can work with nature in the state’s unique environment to establish a landscape that is appealing while also conserving water resources and protecting water quality.
water wise landscape 1

Water Wise Landscape

Search plant database Learn aboutwatering restrictions Waterwise landscaping helps save water resources Florida is known for its beautiful greenery, abundant sunshine and the many lakes, rivers and streams that dot the peninsula’s interior. When Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon first sailed along Florida’s east coast in 1513, he named this area of the New World for its abundance of flowers and greenery, calling the area La Florida in honor of Pascua Florida (the feast of the flowers). Centuries later, Florida still attracts new residents and visitors — at least in part — because of its floral beauty. Florida’s weather also attracts many, but the natural cycle of weather that brings rain to replenish our water sources is constantly changing. The long periods of wet weather followed by long periods of dry weather means that the water to sustain the state’s plants and animals — and us — is limited. Often, the biggest use of water by people is outdoors for lawn and landscape irrigation. To find a balance in our uses of water and the needs of nature, water conservation must be a part of people’s everyday practices. Using water wisely in our landscapes is one way to find that balance. Waterwise is a common sense way to landscape that conserves water and protects the environment. The main objective is to establish and maintain a healthy landscape by matching the right plants with existing site conditions so that the use of additional resources — such as water, fertilizer, pesticides and labor — is minimized. In addition, waterwise landscaping practices reduce the amount of pollutants reaching water bodies because fewer yard chemicals are used. Fertilizers and pesticides can contaminate waterways when they are washed out of the yard with the rain in stormwater runoff. Florida’s water management districts were established to make sure that people and nature have the water they need. We invite you to explore the information here and on the Florida-Friendly Landscaping™ website to learn how you can work with nature in the state’s unique environment to establish a landscape that is appealing while also conserving water resources and protecting water quality.
water wise landscape 2

Water Wise Landscape

Often, the biggest use of water by people is outdoors for lawn and landscape irrigation. To find a balance in our uses of water and the needs of nature, water conservation must be a part of people’s everyday practices. Using water wisely in our landscapes is one way to find that balance.
water wise landscape 3

Water Wise Landscape

Waterwise is a common sense way to landscape that conserves water and protects the environment. The main objective is to establish and maintain a healthy landscape by matching the right plants with existing site conditions so that the use of additional resources — such as water, fertilizer, pesticides and labor — is minimized.
water wise landscape 4

Water Wise Landscape

Centuries later, Florida still attracts new residents and visitors — at least in part — because of its floral beauty. Florida’s weather also attracts many, but the natural cycle of weather that brings rain to replenish our water sources is constantly changing. The long periods of wet weather followed by long periods of dry weather means that the water to sustain the state’s plants and animals — and us — is limited.
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Water Wise Landscape

In its best year, David Salman’s Santa Fe garden gets about 12 inches of precipitation. This high desert area is currently experiencing its driest decade in recent history, yet David’s garden has never looked better. His secrets benefit all gardeners: Save water, and grow native plants. He funnels rooftop runoff underground so no water is lost to evaporation. This allows him to grow a bigger garden without spending much on watering. He also digs deep to find the right plants. As the chief horticulturist of High Country Gardens nursery (highcountrygardens.com), he breeds and develops colorful, textural beauties that thrive in poor soil and drought. “Just because a garden isn’t watered a lot doesn’t mean it needs to be barren,” he says.
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Water Wise Landscape

The correct lighting to your landscape can increase your yard’s safety and functionality. Our experts are knowledgeable in design, functionality, and installation of outdoor lighting.
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Water Wise Landscape

'Yankee Point' ceanothus, favored for its compact habit, sturdy nature, and blue flowers, hugs a corner of the front yard. Steven Gunther Pinterest PagesPrevious 13 of 23 Next View All Santa Monica eco-conscious landscape 1. Use permeable paving It helps rainfall percolate easily into the soil. The paths in the Zinners’ garden are covered with gravel, and a small square patio in the front yard is of decomposed granite. 2. Extend the season Since most California natives bloom in spring, combine them with plants that flower at other times. Blanc added butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa), coral fountain (Russelia equisetiformis), and Mexican lobelia (Lobelia laxiflora) for summer color. 3. Go on sustainable-garden tours You’ll find ideas as well as designers who can help you realize them. The Zinners discovered garden designer Stephanie Blanc on such a tour.
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PagesPrevious 13 of 23 Next View All Santa Monica eco-conscious landscape 1. Use permeable paving It helps rainfall percolate easily into the soil. The paths in the Zinners’ garden are covered with gravel, and a small square patio in the front yard is of decomposed granite. 2. Extend the season Since most California natives bloom in spring, combine them with plants that flower at other times. Blanc added butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa), coral fountain (Russelia equisetiformis), and Mexican lobelia (Lobelia laxiflora) for summer color. 3. Go on sustainable-garden tours You’ll find ideas as well as designers who can help you realize them. The Zinners discovered garden designer Stephanie Blanc on such a tour.
water wise landscape 9

Santa Monica eco-conscious landscape 1. Use permeable paving It helps rainfall percolate easily into the soil. The paths in the Zinners’ garden are covered with gravel, and a small square patio in the front yard is of decomposed granite. 2. Extend the season Since most California natives bloom in spring, combine them with plants that flower at other times. Blanc added butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa), coral fountain (Russelia equisetiformis), and Mexican lobelia (Lobelia laxiflora) for summer color. 3. Go on sustainable-garden tours You’ll find ideas as well as designers who can help you realize them. The Zinners discovered garden designer Stephanie Blanc on such a tour.

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9 Photos of the "Water Wise Landscape"

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