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Vegetable Garden Planner

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Vegetable Garden Planner

Intensive Cropping This type of planting a garden with vegetables means using in wide bands, generally 1-4 feet across and as long as you like. Intensive cropping reduces the amount of area needed for paths, but the closer spacing of the plants usually means you have to weed by hand. Because of the handwork required, when thinking how to plan a vegetable garden with rows remember: It is important not to make the bands wider than you can comfortably reach. Intensive cropping also allows you to design your vegetable garden, making it a good choice, for example, if you want to grow vegetables in your front yard. It’s a great solution for mixing vegetables with ornamentals, as well. A specialized version of intensive cropping is the “square-foot method.” This system divides the garden into small beds (typically 4×4 feet), that are further subdivided into 1-foot squares. Each 1-foot square is planted with one, four, nine, or 16 plants, depending on the size of the plant when it matures. It also makes sense to leave some areas of the garden unplanted at first. This allows you to plant a second crop to harvest later in the season. Lettuce, radishes, green onions, carrots, and bush beans are commonly planted several times during the season. Don’t miss these other vegetable-garden design tips! Download our free vegetable garden plans!
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Vegetable Garden Planner

Why Plant a Garden with Vegetables Starting a vegetable garden at home is an easy way to save money — that $2 tomato plant can easily provide you with 10 pounds of fruit over the course of a season. But planting a garden with vegetables also gives you the pleasure of savoring a delicious, sun-warmed tomato fresh from your backyard. In almost every case, the flavor and texture of varieties you can grow far exceed grocery store produce. Plus, growing vegetables can be fun. It’s a great way to spend time with children or have a place to get away and spend time outdoors in the sun. Learning what to plant in a garden with vegetables, and how to tend them for the best harvest, is probably easier than you think. If you plan it right, you can enjoy a beautiful garden full of the fruits of your labor, without having to spend hours and hours tending it. Planting a garden that includes vegetables and flowers means you’ve combined natural companions, and that can turn a potential eyesore into an attractive landscape feature. Read on for more tips on your first vegetable garden! Get inspired by the White House vegetable garden!
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Vegetable Garden Planner

Experiment with bed designs and plant placement. If your garden beds are already in place, simply set up your garden’s template in the Vegetable Garden Planner and start plugging in plants. The vegetables and herbs have already been coded with space requirements, so you can quickly see how many will fit in a given bed or row. Or, use the Garden Planner to design new beds for any garden.
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Vegetable Garden Planner

With our free online planner, you can get the blueprints to a super-productive vegetable garden, based on square-foot gardening techniques instead of traditional rows. Click the Pre-Planned Gardens to get a quick start. Choose from 26 options, including many designed just for elevated raised beds. To create your own garden, click Plan Your Own Garden. Just drag and drop crops to the planting grid and the planner fills in the number of plants.
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Vegetable Garden Planner

Find the average first and last frost dates for your area, based on records from over 5,000 weather stations across the United States and Canada. All you have to do is punch in your ZIP code, and the Garden Planner software does the rest. If your experience in your microclimate points you toward different dates, you have the option of setting the frost dates yourself. The Planner will use these dates to tell you the best planting times for more than 130 garden crops. This function is a great one to use during the free 7-day trial. If you want, the Planner will even send you twice-monthly reminders about what crops to sow and plant from your plans.
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Vegetable Garden Planner

With the help of our interactive Vegetable Garden Planner, you can quickly get the data you need to design your best garden ever — and it’s all free for 7 days. To get all the same great features on your iPad, try our Grow Planner app.
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Unlike GrowVeg.com or the Kitchen Garden Planner, PlanGarden does not have automated data entry for plant spacing. They provide a Vegetable Calculator and a Frost Calculator to help you space things and decide when to plant, but you have to look up each vegetable you want to grow with those calculators, and place that data into your garden plan yourself.
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Plan crop rotations. Plants are coded according to the botanical family to which they belong, and the Garden Planner keeps track of what you have grown where. When you plan next year’s garden based on this year’s plan, the Planner will warn you if you try to follow tomatoes with potatoes, squash with pumpkins, or otherwise violate standard rotation practices. This video details the crop rotation features:
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Fall-Harvest Vegetable Garden Fresh lettuce, spinach, and peas aren’t limited to spring vegetable garden ideas. Replant as temperatures cool in late summer for a second round of these favorites. Garden Size: 4 by 4 feet Download this plan now.
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Colorful Vegetable Garden Red cabbage, golden oregano, and Johnny jump-up teams with chard, lettuce, onions, and other favorites to create a vegetable garden idea that looks great and provides lots of tasty treats. Garden size: 16 by 32 feet. Download this plan now.
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Heritage Vegetable Garden This vegetable garden idea includes many heirloom varieties, such as ‘Brandywine’ tomato, ‘White Wonder’ cucumber, and ‘Amish Snap’ pea for great-tasting produce all season long. Garden size: 10 by 20 feet Download this plan now.
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Summer Bounty Vegetable Garden Once the soil warms, plant summer-yielding vegetables such as tomatoes and peppers as in this vegetable garden idea. Toss in some herbs for extra color, flavor, and texture. Garden Size: 4 by 4 feet Download this plan now.
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Determining How Much Space You Need Once you know what you want to plant, you can figure out how to plan a vegetable garden with the right amount of space. Keep in mind that when figuring out what to plant in a garden with vegetables, you don’t need a large space to begin. If you choose to grow in containers, you don’t even need a yard — a deck or balcony may provide plenty of space. In fact, a well-tended 10×10-foot vegetable garden will usually produce more than a weed-filled or disease-ridden 25×50-foot bed. Get ideas for growing veggies in containers.
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For a vegetable garden, you reply Submitted by Almanac Staff on March 19, 2014 – 4:27pm For a vegetable garden, you want rich, well-drained soil of loamy texture. Most soil needs the addition of some organic matter such as compost. To see if you have the right soil, you could do a soil test. Contact your local Cooperative Extension office for information on getting your soil pH tested. 
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Learning what to plant in a garden with vegetables, and how to tend them for the best harvest, is probably easier than you think. If you plan it right, you can enjoy a beautiful garden full of the fruits of your labor, without having to spend hours and hours tending it. Planting a garden that includes vegetables and flowers means you’ve combined natural companions, and that can turn a potential eyesore into an attractive landscape feature. Read on for more tips on your first vegetable garden!

An Elegant Salad Garden This compact, row-cropped vegetable garden idea features leafy salad greens, herbs, onions, and some easy-to-grow flowers. Garden Size: 26 by 19 feet Download this plan now. See our entire collection of garden plans.
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i am looking for some input with my vegetable garden. my garden is very healthy and growing but don't seem to produce many vegetables. is there a reason why this is happening. i planted eggplant, butternut, zucinni and red peppers but after all he hard work and a luscious garden there is hardly any vegetables. please help!
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Deciding What to Plant in a Garden with Vegetables At first, when deciding what to plant in a garden with vegetables, it’s best to start small. Many gardeners get a little too excited at the beginning of the season and plant more than they need, being that a number of vegetables tend to be high-yield. So first, think about how much your family will eat when you’re planning a vegetable garden. Keep in mind that vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, and squash keep providing throughout the season — so you may not need many plants to serve your needs. Other vegetables, such as carrots, radishes, and corn, produce only once. You may need to plant more of these. Check out these 10 must-grow vegetables!
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Choosing Varieties Once you start deciding what to plant in a garden with vegetables, you’ll probably notice that the possibilities for are endless. There are thousands of tomato varieties alone! When selecting varieties, pay close attention to the description on the tag or in the catalog. Each variety will be a little different: Some produce smaller plants that are ideal for small gardens or containers, others offer great disease resistance, improved yields, better heat- or cold-tolerance, or other features. Seed catalogs are one of the best sources for vegetables. Once you narrow your choices to types of vegetables, pick two or three varieties that seem promising. That way if one variety doesn’t perform well, you’ll have other plants to make up for it. Next year, grow the best performer again, and choose another to try. Many vegetables can be started early indoors or purchased already started from a garden center. The benefit of this approach is that you can have a crop ready to harvest several weeks earlier than if you were to plant seeds in the ground. Starting vegetables indoors is not difficult, but it does require some time and attention. Seed packages list the options you have for planting particular seed. Use our plant encyclopedia to find the best vegetable varieties for your garden!

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18 Photos of the "Vegetable Garden Planner"

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