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Planting A Flower Garden

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Planting A Flower Garden

Search Add New Question Should I get soil and mulch if my front yard is all mud? wikiHow Contributor You should fill in your yard with dirt so it does not hold water and stay muddy. Then add the soil and mulch. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 2 Helpful 7 How do I trim an overgrown sage plant? wikiHow Contributor You should use scissors or a knife and just trim the parts that are overgrown! Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 2 Helpful 6 Can I put chickens in with my garden? wikiHow Contributor It is up to you. Just make sure you don’t use any harsh chemicals or plants that could hurt the chickens. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 9 Helpful 15 How do I make a backyard flower garden in an area that has rocks and grass in it? wikiHow Contributor You should make a container garden and plant your flowers in pots. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 3 Helpful 7 What do I do if the garden already has mulch? wikiHow Contributor Remove the layer of mulch with a shovel, plant the flowers, and then replace the mulch over the dirt. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 12 Helpful 16 How do I garden if it has a tarp? wikiHow Contributor Cut through the tarp to plant the seeds, put dirt (not the cut off tarp) on the seed, and do the regular things you need to do to grow plants. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 7 Helpful 10 I always have a lot of grass growing in my flower garden, how do I limit the grass growth? wikiHow Contributor The best way to keep grass and weeds out is to lay a tarp over the area, then plant your flowers, then add mulch. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 1 Should I add mulch after planting the flowers? wikiHow Contributor Like us, plants require good airflow to stay alive and well, and mulching too close can suffocate a plant. Mulching first is recommended and never more than 3″. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 0 Should I use mulch or fertilizer on a flower bed? wikiHow Contributor Both! Fertilizer contains nutrients for the flowers, while mulch conserves the soil moisture, puts an end to weeds, and improves the soil texture. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 0 Helpful 0
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Planting A Flower Garden

While starting a flower bed requires some planning and forethought beforehand, it’s not as difficult as one might think to build a flower bed from scratch. There are many types of flower gardens and no two are ever quite the same. You can plant a flower bed any way you like – big or small, curved or straight, raised or flat – whatever. Flower beds can also be changed as time goes on or as space permits. Let’s look at how to create a flower bed.
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Planting A Flower Garden

In choosing the location for my flower bed and the placement of my plants, I followed a practice known as “layering.” In the context of planting flower beds, “layering” means you put the tallest flower bed plants in the back, the shortest in the front row, and the remaining plants in between. My layered flower bed should provide maximum visual appeal when all the plants mature.
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Planting A Flower Garden

Sunflowers Sunflower seeds are large and easy to handle, so they’re great for children or beginner gardeners. ‘Shock-O-Lat’, shown here, has giant, chocolate-brown blooms with golden tips. You can find sunflowers in many different sizes and colors; they grow happily in sunny gardens. Zinnia Look for zinnias in almost every color except blue; they’re also available in a variety of heights. The flowers may look like daisies or dahlias, spiders or pom poms and more. Plant them in the sun and space them as directed on the seed packet or label; good air circulation helps prevent disease. Marigolds Cheerful marigolds are easy to grow in sunny spots, brightening your garden with shades of yellow, red and gold as they bloom all summer long. African or American type marigolds grow 3 to 5 feet tall, but you can find shorter and more compact varieties. Pansies Pansies (Viola x wittrockiana) add color to your garden while the weather is cool, in spring and fall. They’ll even overwinter in some regions if they’re mulched for protection. Give these undemanding little plants sun and soil that drains easily. Impatiens Impatiens ask little more than a shady spot and enough water to keep them from wilting. Plant these pretty annuals when the weather is reliably warm. In recent years, many impatiens (I. walleriana) have succumbed to downy mildew. ‘Big Bounce’ (pictured) is a new hybrid for shade to partial sun that resists this deadly disease. You’ll also find disease-resistant impatiens in the ‘Bounce’ series. Begonias Tough, can’t-kill summer begonias like ‘Surefire Rose’ are great for hanging baskets, containers or garden beds. Give them sun or shade and they’ll reward you with lots of lush color. Snapdragons Bring butterflies to your beginner’s garden with pink and cream snapdragons (Antirrhinum majus) like ‘Twinny Appleblossom’. These plants bloom heavily and stand up to the often harsh weather in spring and fall. Daffodils Plant daffodil bulbs and stand back. They’ll burst into bloom each spring, filling your garden with color and fragrance. Give these hardy bulbs a sunny or partly sunny home in the garden or in containers; they’re best planted in the fall. Cosmos Add cosmos plants to your garden or grow these daisy-like flowers from seeds. These annuals are so undemanding, they’ll bloom even in poor soils. They like full sun (but appreciate afternoon shade in hot climates) and tolerate drought once they’re up and growing. Geraniums Great in window boxes, hanging baskets, pots or the garden, geraniums are low-maintenance plants. Grow these perky flowers for color from spring until frost; they prefer full sun, but may need some afternoon shade in hot regions. Morning Glories To help morning glory seeds sprout, soak them in tepid water the night before you plant or file the hard seed coat to open it. Once they’re started, morning glories can take care of themselves. But because they drop their seeds and self-sow readily, be careful where you plant them or you’ll be pulling volunteers for years! To help control unwanted seedlings, mow, rake or heavily mulch the ground underneath the plants. Blanket Flower (Gaillardia) Blanket flowers (Gaillardia) are native wildflowers in parts of the U.S., and they grow robustly in full sun. These butterfly magnets bloom from early summer into fall. Daylilies These sun-loving perennials bloom dependably in almost any kind of soil, as long as it drains easily. Best of all, you can divide them after a time and expand your garden.
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Planting A Flower Garden

1. Get an idea. Is this going to be a vegetable garden? An herb garden? A flower garden? If you choose to grow flowers, do you want annuals, which you must replant each year but which give color most of the summer? Or do you prefer perennials, which have a shorter bloom time but come back year after year? You can mix any of the above—after all, it’s your garden. Just one bit of advice: Start small. ‘Tis better to succeed just a little, than to fail grandly. 2. Pick a place. Almost all vegetables and most flowers need about six hours of full sun each day. Spend a day in your chosen spot and watch how the sun moves across the space. It might receive more sun than you think. But don’t despair if your lot is largely sunless; many plants tolerate shade. Check plant tags or ask the staff at your local garden center to find out how much sun a plant requires. Put the garden where you can’t ignore its pleas for attention—outside the back door, near the mailbox, by the window you stare out when you dry your hair. Place it close enough to a water spigot that you won’t have to drag the hose to the hinterlands.
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Planting A Flower Garden

1-2 hours Planting annual and perennial flowers is easy, and rewards with beautiful blooms It’s best to plant flowers when it’s not especially hot or sunny. An overcast day when rain is in the forecast is ideal. Most flowers should be planted after your region’s last frost date. Spring is the most popular time to plant, but perennials do fine if planted in early fall in the North and late fall in the South. WHAT YOU NEED FOR THIS PROJECT Ground rake Hand trowel Garden hose Watering can Spade Shovel Utility knife Compost Mulch Annuals Perennials Tools Ground rake Hand trowel Garden hose Watering can Spade Shovel Utility knife Materials Compost Mulch Annuals Perennials 1 Choose your plants Look for short, stocky plants with few flowers and healthy, disease-free foliage. Avoid plants that are spindly, discolored or wilted. 2 Remove plant from pot Knock the plant from its pot and keep as much of the root ball as possible. If the plant’s roots are heavily entwined, cut through them with a knife or pull them apart with your hands. 3 Pinch off flowers Pinch existing flowers off so that the plant can put its energy into developing a good root system instead of flowering. 4 Prepare garden bed • Prepare the garden bed with a spade, working in at least 1 inch of organic matter. • The soil should be loosened to a depth of at least 12 inches for annuals and 18 inches for perennials. • Smooth the soil with a ground rake. • Plant the flowers at the same soil level as they were in the container. • Each year add more organic matter to the soil, or top a bed each year with a 2-inch layer of compost. 5 Mulch garden bed Mulch the garden bed with 1 to 3 inches of aged wood chips, bark, grass clippings, pine needles or any other organic mulch to suppress weeds, conserve moisture and prevent soil-borne diseases.

Planting A Flower Garden

Planting A Flower Garden

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