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Memorial Garden Ideas

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Memorial Garden Ideas

A garden planted in memory of a loved one offers a quiet, lovely place to remember a life well-lived. Give some thought to location when you plan your garden. Put it outside a window in your home, so you can see it during the day, or keep it nearby so it’s easy to visit. While the garden honors your loved one, caring for it can help you work through your grief. A memorial garden can as simple as a single tree, or as elaborate as beds of perennial and annual flowers, shrubs, and ornamental grasses. Some people include a fountain or pond to add the soothing sounds of water, along with a bench to sit and meditate. You may want to install a plaque or marker engraved with your loved one’s name, dates of life or military service, and a meaningful quote. If you have time to care for the garden year-round, think about how it will look as the seasons change, and use plants with staggered bloom times to keep the flowers coming. Tulips, daffodils, and other bulbs provide spring color, along with forsythias, crabapples, ornamental cherries, and dogwoods. Roses, hydrangeas, lilies, impatiens, petunias, vinca, daisies and many other flowers blossom through the summer, while foliage plants like hostas and coleus can fill shady nooks. Maples, mums, asters, Indian grass, ginkos, burning bush, and sedums add shades of bronze, gold, red, and purple to the autumn palette. For winter interest, try ornamental cabbages and pansies. Grass makes a lush carpet for a memorial spot, but ground cover plants are easier to maintain. Stepping stones or pebbled paths can help avoid mowing and trimming. When space and time are limited, an individual tree can become a tribute. Oak trees connote strength, and sycamores  symbolize hope and protection, like the base of an upended sycamore preserved at Ground Zero in New York City. Flying the American flag has special significance if you’re honoring a serviceman or woman. Learn how to properly display the flag in your garden. Red, white, and blue flowers make a patriotic statement. Look for daisies, impatiens, clematis, salvia, and geraniums in white, and roses, petunias, begonias, and zinnias in shades of red. For blue, use salvia, morning glories, evolvulus, cornflowers, hydrangeas, grape hyacinths, and iris. No matter how large or small, a memorial garden will honor your loved one and keep your memories evergreen. Images: Shutterstock/cjgphotography; Shutterstock/Browyn Photo
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Memorial Garden Ideas

25 Ideas for Fresh Garden Style Bring vibrant outdoor style inside with evergreen ideas for garden-style decorating Garden Design: Connect Your Indoor and Outdoor Spaces Let your indoor space inspire your landscape design plans. Define Your Outdoor Space With a Garden Fence Discover the materials and design that will work best for your garden boundary, whether it is a fence, wall or hedge. Make a Magnetic Herb Garden for the Fridge If you’ve always wanted to keep herbs indoors but simply don’t have the counter space, this smart upcycling project will have you cooking with fresh ingredients in no time! How to Make a Window Box Container Garden Create a window box that will beautify the outside of your home and attract wildlife at the same time. How to Make a Container Water Garden To grace an outdoor setting, a table or even an office, create a pond-in-a-pot with these simple step-by-step instructions. How to Make a Vertical Garden With PVC Pipe Plant a small-space vertical garden using PVC pipe. Create a Fairy Theme in Your Garden Creative gardening lets you sprinkle a little enchantment in your outdoor space. Party Garden Favorite plants and old standbys are seen in this Georgia garden. Garden Designers Learn about garden designers—how to find one, what you can expect and what those letters ASLA and ASPD actually mean.
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Memorial Garden Ideas

Losing a loved one is never easy. For those of us left behind, creating a living tribute in the form of a memorial garden offers us a place to grieve, reflect, and pay homage to our loved one’s memory. Enlisting the help of friends and family in the creation and maintenance of the memorial garden will offer all involved a chance to heal. Whether you have lost a human or animal companion, here are some thoughts on creating a memorial garden to honor their memory. AdDetermining Size and Location
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Memorial Garden Ideas

If you have enough space, create an enclosed area. This could be a physical structure, like a small gazebo, or a garden “room” where tall plants, trees, shrubs and grasses form the “walls.” The idea is to give you a sense of privacy, so you can spend time in reflection or prayer. Use plants from your loved one’s garden. Transplant favorite bulbs and tubers; save seeds for sowing; or root cuttings from shrubs and other plants. Plant in a heart shape or other meaningful design. Incorporate plants with special meanings. Baby’s breath suggests innocence and gentleness, while Easter lilies symbolize faith and new life. Amaranth represents everlasting beauty. Rosemary stands for remembrance. Use plants in your loved one’s favorite color or patriotic colors. Plant a tree. Southern magnolias, blue spruce trees, gingkos, beeches, maples and oaks are long-lived and seldom bothered by diseases. Eastern redbuds and dogwoods burst into bloom each spring. A Japanese dwarf maple makes a striking focal point. Plant a theme garden, such as a butterfly garden for someone who loved butterflies, or grow plants that attract birds for someone who enjoyed watching them. Roses have their own “language of color.” Red represents romantic love, while pink roses indicate admiration and appreciation. Yellow stands for friendship, and white means honor and respect. Do a little research online to learn more. If sun is scarce, try hostas and ferns for a shady memorial. The flowers or colorful foliage of Astilbe, impatiens, coleus, hydrangeas, fancy-leaved caladiums, creeping jenny, Browallia, and tuberous begonias will brighten the spot. Add a stepping-stone or plaque inscribed with a quote, or purchase a kit that allows you to personalize a small cement stone. Choose an appropriate statue for your garden, such as an angel for a child or an eagle for a veteran. Place a bench or chair in your memorial area, so you can rest and meditate there.
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Memorial Garden Ideas

Another idea for a focal point would be a statue or concrete figurine. One favorite for a memorial garden is a cast concrete angel or cherub. To find your special statue, look in the yellow pages for “concrete products” or “statuary”. Home improvement centers also sell them.Once you have the focal point or “centerpiece” of your memorial garden, plan for some small shrubs and flower beds. Select plants you know your lost one loved, such as roses, lilacs or jasmine. Use evergreen azaleas or rhododendrons to provide backdrop and round out the display.For the flowerbeds, consider “bleeding heart”, “forget-me-nots”, tulip bulbs, violets or violas, daffodils, lilies of the valley or even sunflowers. You also might consider planting a wildflower plot or an elegant butterfly garden to honor your lost loved one. (See more on butterfly gardens below).
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Memorial Garden Ideas

Like the size of your memorial garden, its location depends on the space you have available. If you are creating a memorial garden within existing garden space, you may think about selecting a site that offers visitors a sense of privacy, or a site that has a favorite view or held a significant meaning to your loved one.
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Memorial Garden Ideas

A memorial garden lives on. Live plants, by their nature, can provide soothing comfort to you during your bereavement, while providing many years of pleasant improvement to your landscape. Pick a quiet corner or spot in which to construct your special garden. You will need to select a focal point for the project. Good choices would be a memorial bench, fountain, sundial, large special rose bush or small accent tree.
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Memorial Garden Ideas

If you love the idea of creating a memorial garden but don't have a big amount of space to dedicate to a variety of flowers, plants or larger additions such as the wood bench, a wind chime is another beautiful idea. With every gust of wind that makes your memorial wind chime ring, you'll think of this special person.
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Beautiful and bright, wildflowers and forget-me-nots are the perfect florals for memorial gardens. From the moment you plant them, they will symbolize the love and light you felt for the person who has passed. In addition, these flowers attract butterflies which are not only beautiful, but they're symbolic of hope, growth and transendence. If you like the idea of growing these colorful blooms, consider planting seed paper memorial favors. Created with eco-friendly materials, these products can be planted in a pot or garden to commemerate the life of a loved one who has passed. Since the act of planting the paper and growing flowers takes time, they symbolize the healing process and how although grief is a journey, the other side will be beautiful and strong.
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It was planted in about a 10’x8′ masse – took my breath away. It was at a memorial garden dedicated to the first responders at the nearby World Trade Center, now Ground Zero. This garden was planted and kept up by residents of Battery Park. I think I cried at the beauty of the sentiment, and the garden. It was awesome. So I will forever associate Hakone All Gold with that beautiful garden these neighbors labored over for their friends, family, first responders – America’s heros.

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