Sponsored Links

Landscaping Plants For Front Of House 4

landscaping plants for front of house 4
Sponsored Links

Creating an Attractive Front Every house facade and site have visual assets and liabilities. The well-done front yard highlights the pleasing points and masks the poor ones. All the elements of good design come into play as you arrange your component parts for the ideal front yard. But don't be put off by the aesthetic terms -- balance, scale, unity, and the like -- used by designers. All are largely a matter of common sense. If a scene pleases your eye, then it's probably well designed. If your house needs or will adapt to your desire for a special theme garden like colonial, cottage, Oriental, or Spanish, the look must begin in the front yard. Themes are successful only if you unify all the garden aspects carefully. You'll also need to determine if your preference is for, and your site demands, a formal or informal landscape. Formal settings include strong geometric lines and architectural features, clipped hedges, and uniformly shaped plants and beds. Informal designs are marked by free-flowing, natural-looking elements. Generally, informal home styles and sloping land require less rigid landscapes. Formal houses and flat land can be treated either way. To achieve balance in a landscape, try to position elements so they give equal weight -- through size, color, texture, or other aspects -- to each side of a scene. How formal this weighting should be again is dictated by style of house and personal preference. Symmetrical houses often look best when each feature and plant is duplicated on the opposite side of a front walk (as long as the walk isn't too long or too narrow). Most houses, though, are asymmetrical, since they have only one garage or drive. In this case, balance is more subtle. Perhaps a tall tree belongs on the side opposite the driveway. Achieving pleasant scale -- or, keeping elements in proportion to each other -- is also subtle, since plants must grow before you can be sure. Choose plants that will complement your home's size at maturity, as well as some plants that will grow fast enough to quickly make a mark. Don't let anything dwarf your house. The design principles of unity and simplicity often go together. Several plants of the same color and kind have more effect and give greater pleasure in a landscape than one each of several types. Use only enough variety for sustaining bloom and adding visual interest. If you want more types of plants, say for continual harvests of many kinds of fruit, try combining plants with similar or at least compatible shapes, textures, and foliage or bloom colors.

Sponsored Links