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Landscaping Company Names

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Landscaping Company Names

Landscapers are the elves of Mother Earth, giving her life, keeping her beautiful and healing her wounds. In return, the earth gives high doses of Vitamin D and a way to earn a living. Seems like quite the beneficial relationship! If professional landscaping is something you are interested in, read on! Having professional-level equipment and excellent service can help you land some clients, but you’ll need something that will lure them in first so they can experience what your company has to offer. What better way to do this than to have a great business name? Your name is the first impression you will make on a potential customer, and it could mean the difference between them choosing you or your competitor. Since most regions have lots of different landscaping companies, you’re going to face some stiff competition. You need something that will set you above the rest right off the bat. Your business needs to sound professional as well as unique and catchy! Here’s a list of 50 names to help you get some inspiration.
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Landscaping Company Names

K is for keeping focused The Greenery decided to distinguish itself from its competition this year by focusing on ways to exceed customers’ expectations. Lee Edwards, CEO of the company in Hilton Head Island, S.C., says that punctuality is key. The Greenery has in-house training programs to instruct employees on calling back customers within four hours and having friendly interactions with both residential and corporate customers. The employees also do role playing so they can project a good image and high level of professionalism. “People see somebody who is walking around their yard grumbling and gruff looking – it just doesn’t give as good a feeling as if somebody says ‘good morning’ or ‘how are you?’” he says. Edwards says the company has always had a focus on customer service, but the new training program helps employees learn how to handle certain situations. “It’s like that old saying: ‘Customer service isn’t a department, it’s an attitude,’” Edwards says. “If somebody needs something, you’re the person who needs to take care of it.” – BG L is for LEED It’s all about LEED for Thornton, Colo.-based Urban Farmer. The landscape construction, maintenance and reclamation company has made a name for itself vying on projects that pursue LEED certification from the U.S. Green Building Council – and it’s paying off. Last year, the company increased its revenue by 1.3 percent, and it’s poised for another 1.5 percent jump in 2010, thanks in no small part to the fact that “80 to 90 percent of the jobs we’re doing are LEED at some level,” says Sean Lynam, head of business development. That’s why a number of Urban Farmer employees – including Lynam, a vice president, an estimator and a project manager – are working on obtaining LEED certification. “We’ve done enough jobs that are LEED that we’re in the loop on what’s going on with it, but getting our LEED certifications will bring us up to speed so we can speak intelligently and know how our piece is affecting the overall project,” Lynam says. Even when the company isn’t working on LEED projects, it still emphasizes sustainability. “For us, when it’s LEED-certified, there’s not a whole lot we do differently than any other project,” Lynam says. “It’s just going in and making sure we’re hitting those milestones and requirements, whether it’s installing an all-drip irrigation system or catchbasins for rainwater.” – JC
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Landscaping Company Names

O is for organic Canada has some of the most restrictive measures on the use of pesticides. Because of this, Weed Man, headquartered in Oshawa, Ontario, had to change the entire way it does business. Just ask Chris Lemcke, director of technical services. The company learned early on that fighting the pesticide ban was futile because the tide was too strong. Instead of spending all its resources trying to reverse the tide, Weed Man hopped the crest of the wave and rode it instead. Now, at the forefront of research and development of organic pesticides, Weed Man is not just surviving, it’s thriving while many of its Canadian competitors have been sucked under. Weed Man recognizes that south of the border, organic lawn care is a growing business segment. “More of our U.S. landscape industry professionals are looking to organic solutions to expand their market and grow their businesses as they realize that more restrictive pesticide legislation in the U.S. is inevitable,” says Lemcke. Organic pesticides can’t deliver the exact same results as traditional controls, so, it also requires some re-education. Weed Man’s technicians must work with customers to inform them that they should not expect a weed-free lawn in the future. – TC CLICK TO ENLARGEQ is for quality management Dale Micetic, president of the landscape division of Phoenix-based ISS Grounds Control, understands that service providers need to “close the back door” to keep clients happy. “You can bring all the contracts in the front door, but if you can’t close the back door you’re just churning out relationships,” Micetic says. “You’re churning through money and you’re losing the opportunity to gain long-term relationships.” Micetic instituted the Quality Counts program to monitor employee performance and customer satisfaction. ISS Grounds Control looks for process improvements by going out and rating levels of care in all aspects of landscaping. If they see something that can be improved, they instruct the workers and return later for a follow-up inspection. The company also hired a firm to create e-mail surveys for clients. Micetic likes e-mail because he thinks clients are more open with their feedback than they are in face-to-face critiques. “The goal is to build longevity in your relationships,” he says. “You do that through understanding the customers.” He says companies should ask their clients two questions: “What are we doing well?” and “What makes it difficult to work with our company?” – BG
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Landscaping Company Names

T is for Tenure We live in a culture where it feels almost wrong to not multitask. But Sampuran Khalsa, the CEO, president and owner of Nanak’s Landscaping, just wants to allow his employees the opportunity to focus on what they do best. “We realized early on that we needed to give our company the kind of environment where landscapers who were talented enough to run their own business would choose to stay with us,” Khalsa says. “When you have people with that kind of initiative and talent, if you give them the support they need, they can be free to be great landscapers.” The vision has helped Nanak’s spread to six locations across Florida since it was founded in 1973, and it has also allowed Khalsa to retain hundreds of his employees for long stretches of time. The average tenure for the 75 employees on the management team is more than nine years. Dozens more employees have worked for Nanak’s for more than two decades. During a generation of general movement up the corporate ladder, where jumping from one company to another is common, the stability at Nanak’s has allowed the company to experience whole cycles together and react quickly when similar events occur. “The organization can handle those things,” Khalsa says, “without them becoming major crises.” – ML
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Landscaping Company Names

F is for focus The current recession is nothing new to James Oyler, owner of Dora Landscaping in Apopka, Fla. This recession is the fifth he and his company survived. Oyler’s focus on selective bidding has allowed Dora Landscaping to provide quality projects and uphold the integrity of the industry. When flocks of contractors undercut or inaccurately estimate the cost of a job, Oyler stays out of the fray. “We had these issues in other recessions,” he says. “When things were bad, we scaled the business down and were selective of who we worked for. We’re already very selective of who we work for, but we became more selective in the bidding process.” Oyler’s basic method is to avoid jobs that already have four or five bids. He knows from experience that people who jump into the industry and drive prices down hurt those professionals who know the true cost of business as well as the industry as a whole. “It doesn’t make sense to bid on a job where there are 16 contractors,” he says. And regardless of what the future brings, Oyler says he will continue bidding selectively. “This is my life’s work,” he says. “What happens in this industry we care about greatly, so we have a duty to make sure the pricing is upheld so our guys can have health insurance, uniforms, vacations – so we can treat people the way they want to be treated.” – Bo Gemmell
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Landscaping Company Names

D is for diversifying To diversify their company, David Snodgrass, president of Dennis’ 7 Dees Landscaping & Garden Centers in Portland, Ore., and his partners, brothers Dean and Drew, went back to the foundation their grandparents built more than 80 years ago and bought back a group of garden centers. The purchase helped stabilize the 200-plus employee company’s balance sheet: 24 percent of its $18.5 million in revenue last year came from residential design/build; 28 percent from commercial bid/build; 18 from landscape maintenance and 29 percent from retail.  “It bucks the economy trend,” Snodgrass says of his retail division’s performance this year – up when other areas are stable or down. “That goes back to the diversification – the green industry is never hitting on all cylinders in all areas. Sometimes there are pockets of strength and pockets of weakness. Being diversified allows us to leverage the pockets of strength into the pockets of weakness.” – Chuck Bowen

Landscaping Company Names

Landscaping Company Names

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