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Landscaping Around House Foundation

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Landscaping Around House Foundation

To be on the safe side, don’t plant trees closer than 20’ to your foundation. Keep in mind that roots commonly extend from the tree trunk by as much as one to two times the height of the tree. Some trees, such as spruce trees, grow particularly large far reaching roots, and should be planted 30’ away from your house. When used for landscaping around foundation in the Dallas, Fort Worth area, trees and shrubs often get very large. That’s because tree roots rob your foundation of moisture (this process is called “transpiration.”) Trees that are positioned near your house should be watered a minimum of twice a week during the hot summer months and more often, if needed. If a tree near your home is mature and you cannot remove it, another option is to install a root barrier. Root barriers can be installed 3-5’ deep to redirect tree roots away from your house.Your foundation should not be completely covered by foliage. As a general rule of thumb, approximately 3-5” of your foundation should be visible. Be sure to plant shrubs that are 6’ tall or more approximately 4.5′-5’ away from your foundation. It’s a tip that used when landscaping in the Dallas, Fort Worth area  a lot.
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Landscaping Around House Foundation

Its hot in North Texas. When landscaping your yard, follow this tip to protect your foundation and avoid the need to repair your foundation: Install a sprinkler system that can also water your foundation in summer? Temperatures in this area often exceed 100 degrees. Because excessively dry soil around your foundation can harm it, plan ahead to protect you Dallas, Fort Worth structure and make sure it doesn’t get dry. This system will be particularly valuable in times of extreme Texas droughts and can help minimize cracks. Of course, drainage systems are effective for the opposite problem. If you can’t install a sprinkler system, run a soaker hose around your foundation, keeping it approximately 2′ away from your structure. Watering 15 minutes a day, three to five times a week in the summer, can minimize foundation cracks and other problems. If you need assistance, just contact us online today for foundation repair estimates.
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Landscaping Around House Foundation

Landscaping tips can help when used as part of protecting your foundation in the Dallas, Fort Worth, TX area. Why is it important to maintain your foundation? Because if you have a good drainage systems that can stop problems, you may be able to avoid having foundation repair. Contact us with questions. Below are some solid suggestions that can help alleviate the need for foundation work and protect your foundation. It’s important to stop foundation issues that could necessitate repairs on your Dallas, Fort Worth area house.
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Landscaping Around House Foundation

It’s as important to landscape the sides and back of your property as it is to landscape the front. If only one part of the yard is landscaped, soil on that side will generally expand because it’s likely to be watered more often. Soil expansion can lead to foundation cracks so it’s best to water your property uniformly. Because the expansive clay soil in the Dallas, Fort Worth area affects landscaping and you’ll want to protect your foundation from issues such as large increases in moisture or too little water. Landscaping should be done around your founding using deep rooted plants because shallow rooted plants could erode over a short period of time. Foundation repairs can largely be avoided by following simple landscaping tips like these.
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Landscaping Around House Foundation

Follow this good tip:  Check the grade on your Dallas, Fort Worth property and landscaping to make sure water can’t puddle around your house. Experts generally recommend having a 9-10” drop for the first ten feet around your home to keep moisture from accumulating under your foundation. By taking this step, you may be able to avoid having foundation repair service. It’s a tip worth following in all cities, including Grand Prairie, Mansfield, Arlington, Garland, Colleyville other areas. This equates to a slope of approximately 3-5% away from your foundation. Fill embankments should not be steeper than a two to one slope ratio, with the horizontal slope being a two and the vertical ratio being a one. Without a proper slope, your foundation will experience erosion.
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Landscaping Around House Foundation

“Less Is More” Example of an Ultra-Clean Foundation Planting Photo showing example of how ‘less’ can be ‘more’ in a landscape foundation planting. David Beaulieu If a prior photo showed an example of a foundation planting with a clean look, the foundation planting in the present photo illustrates the super clean look. This picture of foundation shrubbery illustrates the idea, “less is more” in landscape design. Continue to 7 of 18 below.
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Landscaping Around House Foundation

The idea is simple: Foundation plants should enhance your home, make it more welcoming, and tie it to the surrounding landscape. Unfortunately, these house-hugging plantings frequently consist of stiff evergreen shrubs that do little for the house they adorn. Even worse, they’re often sheared into something closer to green loaves of bread than to anything found in nature. Here are some ways to rethink that timeworn row of clipped evergreens. 1. Work with the architecture and overall style of your house. Is your home characterized by formal symmetry, with a centered door and equal numbers of windows lined up on either side—such as on Georgians, Federals, or some Colonial Revivals? If so, you may want to consider a design that has some formal elements, with sheared shrubs accenting the entry and mirror-image plantings on each side of it. On the other hand, informal, cottage-style homes and low-slung ranches look best with more casual, asymmetrical plant schemes. In both cases, avoid competing elements that detract from the main entrance and the house in general, such as tall plantings that block views of your home, or a lone bed in the middle of an open lawn. The area around the entrance is where guests experience your landscape close up, so make this area welcoming with an interesting contrast of plant forms, flowers, and foliage colors and textures. Elsewhere on the facade, a stretch of bare wall between windows is often an invitation for a larger shrub, a small tree, or even a vine-covered trellis. Around windows, be sure not to cut off light and air with plants that will grow too high. Tall plantings placed at the corners of the house help soften its edges and tie it into the landscape. They can also give the illusion of extending a small house, making it appear larger. Medium-size flowering trees like dogwood, Canadian redbud, crabapple, rose-of-Sharon, and crape myrtle all have a loose feel that suits a casual, cottage-style home. More stately traditional homes can be planted at each end with upright English oak, juniper, or groups of Leyland cypress to add a columnlike effect. Of course, it’s worth pointing out that houses that don’t have raised foundations to disguise or have handsome stonework to be showcased may not need more than entrance and corner plantings. A bed of groundcover or mulch may be all that is necessary to tie the two areas together—and make maintenance and mowing easier.

Landscaping Around House Foundation

2 × 2. Go for four seasons of interest. 2. Go for four seasons of interest. Photo by Christopher J. Cohan Variegated wintercreeper, ferns, and grasses provide a bold foliage display; impatiens add color Those yews smothering every other house in your neighborhood may be indestructible, but they’re not much to look at. The right evergreens give a foundation planting year-round structure, but incorporating deciduous shrubs and perennials provides ornamental value all year long. Choose plants with an eye to staggered bloom times from early spring to late summer, colorful fall foliage, and fruits in winter. In addition to being too static, most foundation plantings are also too narrow, with a single row of shrubs that doesn’t extend far enough out into the yard. You may be able to fix that simply by enlarging your bedand adding more plants in front. Layer them back to front from tallest to shortest, making sure none of the new ones towers over the establoshed back row. 3. Choose plants that are the right size and scale. Not taking into account plants’ size at maturity is probably the number-one mistake homeowners make. We’ve all seen windows curtained with overgrown evergreens that no doubt looked just fine when they were planted. Choosing shrubs of the right size will also help keep pruning to a minimum. Look for dwarf varieties that max out at 2 to 4 feet tall for under windows and other tight spots. Above all, plan before you plant. A good place to start is by enlarging a photo of your house and tracing the outline of it on paper. Add a few key features you want to keep, such as mature trees. Then start experimenting, sketching in plants (at their full-grown size and shape) you’re considering. This process will help in choreographing the layout, determining exactly how much you can incorporate, and establishing a thoughtful and economical approach to putting in foundation plantings that truly enhance your home.

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7 Photos of the "Landscaping Around House Foundation"

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