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Landscaping A Slope

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Landscaping A Slope

Landscaping a slope Welcome to Dream Yard's landscaping a slope pictures board. If you are lucky enough to have a slope in your yard, you can naturally create some amazing landscaping features. From rock gardens to waterfalls, it is such a great opportunity for you. Thanks for visiting our pinterest boards.692 Pins181.72k FollowersSloped landscapeSloped gardenLandscaping designHillside landscapingSloped backyardStone steps
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Landscaping A Slope

Swipe to view slides Take up slope as gently as possible in order to limit soil disturbance and retain the natural form of the hillside. This ornamental grass can grow on a steeper slope because it is not mowed. Because Leptospermum lavaegatum is drought tolerant, its roots extend deep into coastal palisades for surface and subsoil stabilization. Irregular hedges of dwarf shrubs hide a series of short retaining walls that allow this site to step down gradually. Slope planting need not be limited to a single monoculture of groundcover when so many other excellent plants are available. This failure is typical of slopes planted with shallow rooted iceplant and other groundcovers which do not bind subsoils and result in sloughing. Utilize a variety of attractive flowering groundcovers along with trees and shrubs for a multidimensional slope protection program. This outdoor kitchen in Bellevue, Wash., takes advantage of hillside space and allows the owner to enjoy the comforts of home outdoors.
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Landscaping A Slope

Take up slope as gently as possible in order to limit soil disturbance and retain the natural form of the hillside. This ornamental grass can grow on a steeper slope because it is not mowed. Because Leptospermum lavaegatum is drought tolerant, its roots extend deep into coastal palisades for surface and subsoil stabilization. Irregular hedges of dwarf shrubs hide a series of short retaining walls that allow this site to step down gradually. Slope planting need not be limited to a single monoculture of groundcover when so many other excellent plants are available. This failure is typical of slopes planted with shallow rooted iceplant and other groundcovers which do not bind subsoils and result in sloughing. Utilize a variety of attractive flowering groundcovers along with trees and shrubs for a multidimensional slope protection program. This outdoor kitchen in Bellevue, Wash., takes advantage of hillside space and allows the owner to enjoy the comforts of home outdoors.
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Landscaping A Slope

When planning any kind of landscaping on a slope, it’s vital to allow for maintenance access. Provide an open through-way to drag cut material out of the area and into trucks. These accessibility paths need not be paved, just fairly level and open. Plan for both vertical and horizontal access across the slope. The ability to manage slope planting ten to twenty years down the road is directly dependent on how well you accommodate these needs today.
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Landscaping A Slope

Thomas J. Story Pinterest PagesPrevious 7 of 11 Next View All How to landscape a slope If you have a steep yard, don’t give up on landscaping—but don’t try to do it entirely on your own. Even a team of professionals found the Bardens’ yard challenging. “The guys were on their hands and knees, crawling up to the top,” says Miller. “The soil is heavy clay, but you can’t till a slope—it will loosen and slide.” To landscape a slope, you need safeguards to keep the hill and plantings in place. Here, the team covered the ground with jute netting, then cut through it to dig planting holes. They covered the netting with a 2-inch layer of wood shavings, then mixed wood chips and good soil into the holes. Finally, they set wire baskets into the holes to protect rootballs from gophers.
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PagesPrevious 7 of 11 Next View All How to landscape a slope If you have a steep yard, don’t give up on landscaping—but don’t try to do it entirely on your own. Even a team of professionals found the Bardens’ yard challenging. “The guys were on their hands and knees, crawling up to the top,” says Miller. “The soil is heavy clay, but you can’t till a slope—it will loosen and slide.” To landscape a slope, you need safeguards to keep the hill and plantings in place. Here, the team covered the ground with jute netting, then cut through it to dig planting holes. They covered the netting with a 2-inch layer of wood shavings, then mixed wood chips and good soil into the holes. Finally, they set wire baskets into the holes to protect rootballs from gophers.
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How to landscape a slope If you have a steep yard, don’t give up on landscaping—but don’t try to do it entirely on your own. Even a team of professionals found the Bardens’ yard challenging. “The guys were on their hands and knees, crawling up to the top,” says Miller. “The soil is heavy clay, but you can’t till a slope—it will loosen and slide.” To landscape a slope, you need safeguards to keep the hill and plantings in place. Here, the team covered the ground with jute netting, then cut through it to dig planting holes. They covered the netting with a 2-inch layer of wood shavings, then mixed wood chips and good soil into the holes. Finally, they set wire baskets into the holes to protect rootballs from gophers.
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Welcome to Dream Yard's landscaping a slope pictures board. If you are lucky enough to have a slope in your yard, you can naturally create some amazing landscaping features. From rock gardens to waterfalls, it is such a great opportunity for you. Thanks for visiting our pinterest boards.
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To preserve the slope, take up the grade with a series of shorter terraces rather than one or two very large ones graded with cut and fill. The larger terraces may require extreme erosion control measures on the cut slope and a substantial retaining wall must be specially engineered to hold the fill. Such walls are constructed with enormous footings, sometimes extending down to bedrock. Such endeavors are growing more frequent due to the extensive hillside grading of subdivisions where mild slopes are built out. Homes on moderate to extreme slopes are prone to mudslides and slope failures in extreme weather.
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Finding Suitable Plants for a Slope Trees, shrubs and spreading plants for protecting slopes vary from state to state. The local USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service studies the best plants for government slope planting projects, and these are the most reliable choices for home landscapes. If you doubt whether your designer or contractor understands the ramifications of slope planting, contact the local office of this federal agency or your local state University Agricultural Extension office for a list of suitable species.
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If you have a steep yard, don’t give up on landscaping—but don’t try to do it entirely on your own. Even a team of professionals found the Bardens’ yard challenging. “The guys were on their hands and knees, crawling up to the top,” says Miller. “The soil is heavy clay, but you can’t till a slope—it will loosen and slide.” To landscape a slope, you need safeguards to keep the hill and plantings in place. Here, the team covered the ground with jute netting, then cut through it to dig planting holes. They covered the netting with a 2-inch layer of wood shavings, then mixed wood chips and good soil into the holes. Finally, they set wire baskets into the holes to protect rootballs from gophers.
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The maximum slope for hillside landscaping should be 3:1. These types of areas can be dry due to water traveling downwards and not seeping into the ground. Therefore, use plants that are somewhat drought tolerant. Watering can be a problem with steep slope gardening. A sprinkler system helps tremendously, particularly if it is a large sloped area.Drip irrigation is  good option.
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Any time you cut into a slope you compromise its integrity, therefore the less you do so the better. Cutting into a slope removes topsoil to expose subsoils, often heavy clays or shale that are poorly drained or lack microbial action of a living topsoil. This is why the planting on so many cut slopes and home pads on exposed subsoil are prone to failure.
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Trees, shrubs and spreading plants for protecting slopes vary from state to state. The local USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service studies the best plants for government slope planting projects, and these are the most reliable choices for home landscapes. If you doubt whether your designer or contractor understands the ramifications of slope planting, contact the local office of this federal agency or your local state University Agricultural Extension office for a list of suitable species.
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The rock swale in this image is somewhat unusual in that it’s nestled along a terraced planting. The image foreground is the swale’s low point, so when the rain comes, it flows parallel to the slope toward the foreground. This is a smart drainage solution for a rocky landscape with a steep slope, because it channels water across the hill and away from the outdoor entertaining area.

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