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Landscape In Spanish

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Landscape In Spanish

Read Excerpt Indigenous Landscapes and Spanish Missions New Perspectives from Archaeology and Ethnohistory Edited by Lee M. Panich; Tsim D. Schneider 256 pp. / 6.00 x 9.00 / 2014 Cloth (978-0-8165-3051-9) Cloth ($55.00) Series – Archaeology of Indigenous-Colonial Interactions in the Americas Related Interest – Indigenous and Native American Studies – Archaeology Spanish missions in North America were once viewed as confining and stagnant communities, with native peoples on the margins of the colonial enterprise. Recent archaeological and ethnohistorical With its breath and scope, Indigenous Landscapes enriches the story of the contested lands on New Spain’s northern frontier. —Catholic Southwest This volume is a valuable contribution to the literature on Spanish colonialism and colonialism in general, both for the update it provides on Spanish mission archaeology in the United States and for the direction it offers on how and why to apply an indigenous landscape perspective. —Southwestern Historical Quarterly This stellar collection of essays turns the old Boltonian concept of the Spanish borderlands on its head by examining Spanish colonial missions—those quintessential Boltonian institutions of civilization on the frontier—from the perspectives of native societies themselves. —Hispanic American Historical Review What makes this volume unique and significant is the integrative theme across regions where archaeologists do not share their results frequently enough, and the focus on Native American actions and agency in various colonial encounters. —Stephen W. Silliman, editor of Collaborating at the Trowel’s Edge: Teaching and Learning in Indigenous Archaeology research challenges that notion. Indigenous Landscapes and Spanish Missions considers how native peoples actively incorporated the mission system into their own dynamic existence. The book, written by diverse scholars and edited by Lee M. Panich and Tsim D. Schneider, covers missions in the Spanish borderlands from California to Texas to Georgia. Offering thoughtful arguments and innovative perspectives, the editors organized the book around three interrelated themes. The first section explores power, politics, and belief, recognizing that Spanish missions were established within indigenous landscapes with preexisting tensions, alliances, and belief systems. The second part, addressing missions from the perspective of indigenous inhabitants, focuses on their social, economic, and historical connections to the surrounding landscapes. The final section considers the varied connections between mission communities and the world beyond the mission walls, including examinations of how mission neophytes, missionaries, and colonial elites vied for land and natural resources. Indigenous Landscapes and Spanish Missions offers a holistic view on the consequences of missionization and the active negotiation of missions by indigenous peoples, revealing cross-cutting perspectives into the complex and contested histories of the Spanish borderlands. This volume challenges readers to examine deeply the ways in which native peoples negotiated colonialism not just inside the missions themselves but also within broader indigenous landscapes. This book will be of interest to archaeologists, historians, tribal scholars, and anyone interested in indigenous encounters with colonial institutions. Top of Page
landscape in spanish 1

Landscape In Spanish

Spanish missions in North America were once viewed as confining and stagnant communities, with native peoples on the margins of the colonial enterprise. Recent archaeological and ethnohistorical With its breath and scope, Indigenous Landscapes enriches the story of the contested lands on New Spain’s northern frontier. —Catholic Southwest This volume is a valuable contribution to the literature on Spanish colonialism and colonialism in general, both for the update it provides on Spanish mission archaeology in the United States and for the direction it offers on how and why to apply an indigenous landscape perspective. —Southwestern Historical Quarterly This stellar collection of essays turns the old Boltonian concept of the Spanish borderlands on its head by examining Spanish colonial missions—those quintessential Boltonian institutions of civilization on the frontier—from the perspectives of native societies themselves. —Hispanic American Historical Review What makes this volume unique and significant is the integrative theme across regions where archaeologists do not share their results frequently enough, and the focus on Native American actions and agency in various colonial encounters. —Stephen W. Silliman, editor of Collaborating at the Trowel’s Edge: Teaching and Learning in Indigenous Archaeology research challenges that notion. Indigenous Landscapes and Spanish Missions considers how native peoples actively incorporated the mission system into their own dynamic existence. The book, written by diverse scholars and edited by Lee M. Panich and Tsim D. Schneider, covers missions in the Spanish borderlands from California to Texas to Georgia.
landscape in spanish 2

Landscape In Spanish

With its breath and scope, Indigenous Landscapes enriches the story of the contested lands on New Spain’s northern frontier. —Catholic Southwest This volume is a valuable contribution to the literature on Spanish colonialism and colonialism in general, both for the update it provides on Spanish mission archaeology in the United States and for the direction it offers on how and why to apply an indigenous landscape perspective. —Southwestern Historical Quarterly This stellar collection of essays turns the old Boltonian concept of the Spanish borderlands on its head by examining Spanish colonial missions—those quintessential Boltonian institutions of civilization on the frontier—from the perspectives of native societies themselves. —Hispanic American Historical Review What makes this volume unique and significant is the integrative theme across regions where archaeologists do not share their results frequently enough, and the focus on Native American actions and agency in various colonial encounters. —Stephen W. Silliman, editor of Collaborating at the Trowel’s Edge: Teaching and Learning in Indigenous Archaeology
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Landscape In Spanish

This study presents synchronic observations about the functional distribution of Spanish and English in the linguistic landscape (LL) of an emergent Latino-oriented commercial node in the urban South, with the goal of highlighting the practical and indexical roles of Spanish on this signage within a local and national context of English hegemony despite cultural pluralism. In describing the term linguistic landscape, Landry and Bourhis (1997:25) state “The language of public road signs, advertising billboards, street names, place names, commercial shop signs and public signs on government buildings combines to form the linguistic landscape of a given territory, region, or urban agglomeration”. Recent research has expanded the scope of publicly visible writing to include “written texts on movable objects” such as newspapers, t-shirts, books, and even tattoos , as well as detritus such as garbage  ;  . The rapid growth of this field during the 21st century has informed research on a wide range of topics including second language acquisition (e.g., ), sociology (e.g.,  ;  ), ethnography of communication (e.g., ;  ;  ), language attitudes (e.g., ), language policy (e.g., ), language ecology (e.g.,  ;  ), and multilingual rhetoric within the context of a culture of tourism (e.g., ;  ;  ). Theoretical questions such as the interwoven topics of mobility, complexity and unpredictability—as captured under the label super-diversity by scholars such as and  ;  —have been addressed in a range of international contexts (e.g., ). Also of note is which, although focused primarily on minority languages in Europe, is relevant to the current study because Spanish functions in many ways as a minority language in the United States. Research on the impact of immigration on the LL of new immigrant neighborhoods in the United States has received little attention thus far, however.
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Landscape In Spanish

Previous LL research on multilingual communities in the United States has largely focused on well-established minority neighborhoods.1 This work includes investigations of public displays of language in Chinatown in Washington, D.C.  ;  ; perceptual dialectology research on Anglo and Hispanic accents in English as correlated with perceived LL in Santa Ynez, California, near Los Angeles ; and several studies that focus on Spanish in the LL of long-standing Hispanic neighborhoods in Washington, D.C. , Los Angeles  ;  , Los Angeles and Miami-Dade County ;  ;  , San Antonio , and the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago . In contrast with this previous work, the current study takes as its focus three strip malls in a relatively new immigrant neighborhood in Charlotte, North Carolina, a city that has experienced a recent rate of growth in its Hispanic population that is among the most rapid in the United States. U.S. census data  ;   reported that individuals of Spanish Origin (categorized as Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Other Spanish) comprised less than 1% of the population in Charlotte-Gastonia in 1980, whereas by 2010 this number was approaching the national average of 16%. This work adds a sociolinguistic perspective to the broader urban landscape observations made by the architect and urban designer José about ways in which the Latino presence in Charlotte is both newly visible (to locals not used to a Latino presence) and still largely invisible (in comparison to well-established Hispanic neighborhoods in cities such as Los Angeles). In addition, several aspects of this developing LL—its decontextualized, non-local quality, as well as the commonalities it shares with other new immigrant areas as described by —allow us to situate our observations in a larger context of new multilingual spaces in the U.S. and across the world.
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Landscape In Spanish

Spanish moss may refer to two different species of epiphytic plants that drape elegantly from trees such as oak (Quercus spp.), using the tree as a support system without stealing nutrients. Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides) is most commonly found in the southeastern United States, while California moss grows on trees in the coastal ranges of central California. You can easily find Spanish moss in craft stores and garden centers if you can’t find it in its natural environment. Use the moss throughout your garden to take advantage of its moisture retention and cascading appearance.

Landscape In Spanish

Landscape In Spanish

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