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Landscape Edging Options

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Landscape Edging Options

Buying Edging Steel edging is the most common metal edging, although you might not find it at local nurseries. Look for it at larger garden centers or at landscape suppliers, which is where most pros get it. (Search “Landscape Equipment and Supplies” online or in your Yellow Pages.) Steel edging comes in 4-in. wide by 10-ft. long strips in a variety of colors. Keep in mind that it’ll eventually rust, especially in a salt environment. It’s heavy, floppy stuff and needs almost full support when you transport it. Aluminum edging, besides being lighter and stiffer, won’t rust and is also available in a wide variety of colors. Look for it through landscaping suppliers, although it might be difficult to find. You might have to order it. Be sure stakes are included with your purchase. You’ll find black plastic edging at every garden center and home center, sometimes in both regular and heavy-duty thicknesses. Buy the thicker material. It better withstands those inevitable bumps and hard knocks that go with lawn mowing.
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Landscape Edging Options

Edging Comparison Chart Use this chart to compare 16 different types of landscape edging. Compare attributes such as cost, visibility, curve options and more. This tool will help you select the right edging for your garden. Landscape Edging Comparison Chart (PDF)
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Landscape Edging Options

Edging in disguise: Many types of edging products are low-profile and are used as weed barriers and lawn separators instead of design elements. They are typically installed into the ground with an inch or two of above ground clearance to hold in mulch or other groundcover. than Aluminum or steel edging is great for straight-line areas and won’t rust, rot or become brittle. It’s installed with stakes and can be molded into shapes and curves. recycled brown lawn edging coil that provides a textured, wood grained look that blends with mulch, rocks or soil. This type of edging is installed with plastic stakes and blocks spreading of grass and maintains a durable boundary.
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Landscape Edging Options

TURFEdging for lawn bears a certain requirement related to turf grass maintenance. A lawn mower must be able to overhang the edging a few inches for the blade to cut all the grass cleanly. Therefore edging should be low enough to allow the lawn mower to glide past easily. Edging that is too high may still be used, but it excludes edging machines that create a clean, knife edge to the turf.

Landscape Edging Options

There are several different types of edging available. The four main types include spade-cut, strip edging, masonry and wood edging. Look around your yard and choose a material that aesthetically matches the design and style of your outdoor space. Each edging material has advantages and some varieties are better suited to certain climates.
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Landscape Edging Options

Swipe to view slides Brick or pavers used as edging are an effective way of keeping lawn from spreading into landscaped beds. A concrete edge can be stamped, colored, or have exposed aggregate to match the rest of your landscape. This simple block edge allows any alignment from sweeps to very tight radii curves. Here brick was laid on edge and half buried for greater stabilization. Brick is a traditional edge for holding pea gravel in place, but shown here, it can sink into some soil types over time to reduce its function as a barrier. The edging in this garden is an extension of the same material used for the path, which creates unity. A mow strip may be tinted, imprinted or veneered to match virtually any other element in the landscape. The gravel here is bounded by tumbled concrete pavers of varying sizes for more visual interest. A plastic ribbon edge can easily disappear under beautiful foliage. Black plastic edging over time can undulate or even curl up at the ends due to extremes of weather and UV exposure.

Landscape Edging Options

Brick or pavers used as edging are an effective way of keeping lawn from spreading into landscaped beds. A concrete edge can be stamped, colored, or have exposed aggregate to match the rest of your landscape. This simple block edge allows any alignment from sweeps to very tight radii curves. Here brick was laid on edge and half buried for greater stabilization. Brick is a traditional edge for holding pea gravel in place, but shown here, it can sink into some soil types over time to reduce its function as a barrier. The edging in this garden is an extension of the same material used for the path, which creates unity. A mow strip may be tinted, imprinted or veneered to match virtually any other element in the landscape. The gravel here is bounded by tumbled concrete pavers of varying sizes for more visual interest. A plastic ribbon edge can easily disappear under beautiful foliage. Black plastic edging over time can undulate or even curl up at the ends due to extremes of weather and UV exposure.
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Landscape Edging Options

Steel edging is the most common metal edging, although you might not find it at local nurseries. Look for it at larger garden centers or at landscape suppliers, which is where most pros get it. (Search “Landscape Equipment and Supplies” online or in your Yellow Pages.) Steel edging comes in 4-in. wide by 10-ft. long strips in a variety of colors. Keep in mind that it’ll eventually rust, especially in a salt environment. It’s heavy, floppy stuff and needs almost full support when you transport it.
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Edging with style: An abundance of edging products and materials are available at your local garden center, with plenty of options to create a look that matches the style of your home and add contrast to your garden or lawn. Consider bricks, stones or concrete block edging for a decorative effect – these products can be stacked or installed vertically or horizontally to create depth, define lines between beds, pathways and grassy areas, and to build short walls that bridge slightly higher elevations to gentle slopes. For a cottage feel, vinyl picket fencing or latticework can be installed around beds for a shabby chic look.
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Edging is often overlooked in landscape design plans, but should be considered a necessity for the creation of neat, maintainable landscaping zones. Nobody likes a messy yard, a borderless wild bed spilling out of its bounds, or an unkempt pathway that screams of neglect. Guess what? Finding and using the best landscape edging can cure many of these and other landscape design dilemmas.
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The attractive soft gray of slate chippings provides a perfect foil for edging plants. Geometric Victorian-style brick edging suits both formal and cottage-style gardens. In an informal area, allow your plants to spill over onto solid brick paving. Log edging is the ideal choice for seaside-themed gardens, especially when used with a gravel mulch, mixed with larger pebbles. Copper piping, bent into a graceful curve, provides a pretty edge that echoes the colors of the planting.
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Strip edging is useful for controlling the edges of gravel fields and pathways where you need a barrier at least three inches above grade. Without edging, gravel tends to travel over time, particularly if it is rounded such as river run or pea gravel. The edges feather out to destroy the original crisp line. The downside is caused by gravel building up against a strip edge, which is not strong enough to bear this weight. Over time the edging will lean and anchor stakes become bent or uprooted to destabilize the edge.
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In landscape design vernacular, edging presents a transition zone. Here the treatment of the ground plain or “floor” of the landscape changes from one material to another. The most frequent of these changes is from lawn to adjacent planter. In the past a spade cut edge was standard, but today that’s considered high maintenance and unsuitable for a modern yard. Now the divider can be made of a variety of materials, with different longevity and cost. While cost is often the bottom line, there are two practical issues that govern the best choice for your edging: lawn maintenance and curves.
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Visit your local garden center and take a look at all the varieties of edging options available. It’s best to see them in person and consider the texture, material, size and flexibility of the products before making your final decision on how best to utilize landscape edging in your yard.
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Use this chart to compare 16 different types of landscape edging. Compare attributes such as cost, visibility, curve options and more. This tool will help you select the right edging for your garden.
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Edging with a dual purpose: If you want to create greater definition between your landscaping zones, consider using landscape timbers or synthetic blocks to build borders or mini-walls around beds or to divide lawns from driveways, pathways and porches. This mode of edging can be used to create terracing and raised beds, as well.
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Many people prefer the natural, unobtrusive look of having no edging at all. However the problem with having no edging is that it is higher maintenance. Mark Paine of Sposato Landscape in Milton, DE says, “We manually edge with a square point spade at a lot of our jobs. We move quickly, and it’s a very clean look.”

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