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Landscape Edging Borders

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Landscape Edging Borders

Edging Around Grass Shows Off Well Maintained Lawn A well defined edging, such as brick shown here, will show off and highlight a manicured lawn. It also helps edging easier and gives lawn a designer flair. Soft Lawn Edging Where Border Meets Grass Soft lawn edging is where the grass and borders meet with an occasional trim to maintain the shape of the lawn. Brick Edging Blends Well with Plantings Brick edging laid as a path between a border and the lawn creates a traditional feel. It also blends well with planting. Paved Edging Gives Informal Effect Paved edging meets the border achieving an informal effect. Plants, such as lavender, billows out from flower beds, softening the hard layout. Wood Edging Retains Soil and Blends With Plantings Wood edging is an easy to install option if soil needs to be retained from spilling into the yard. Conceal with plants so it will blend in, and apply wood preservative to prevent rotting. Manicured Lawns Require Major Upkeep Manicured lawns require a lot of upkeep, mowing, edging weeding and feeding that can be labor intensive. Maintaining Your Edge Edging shears trim grass at the edges without damaging plants in borders. Crisp Brick Edging Brick or other hard materials help keep the lawn out of flower beds. Sharp Edges and a Sophisticated Look Straight-edged geometric forms combine with minimal plantings, including giant horsetails, papyrus, and a Japanese maple, create this clean looking garden. This concept reflect the Asian antecedents of the owners. English Edging English border edging is crisp and clean and keeps the lawn out of the flower beds. Fortified Border A brick and pebble border provides a substantial barrier to keep an encroaching lawn under control. Decking Lumber Used as Ground Level Edging Decking lumber is used as ground level edging against a manicured lawn. Decks are an option for a garden design where otherwise there is no usable space. It can be tied to a building or a freestanding surfacing material.
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Landscape Edging Borders

No newly cut garden bed is complete without some edging to distinguish it from the rest of your yard. Installing landscape edging is an easy DIY project that makes a major impact on the aesthetics of your outdoor space. There are a great variety of edging materials to choose from: metal, stone, brick, plastic, concrete, or wood. You can purchase something at a big box store, or special order your materials if you want to buy your edging. Or, you can save some money and make your own landscape edging with any number of recycled and found materials— glass bottles, steel pipes, clam shells, and even dinner plates. A creative DIY edging can help infuse your garden with a unique sense of style that reflects your personality. Here are some terrific and inventive garden edging ideas to get you started. By Jennifer Noonan Expanded View >
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Landscape Edging Borders

Buying Edging Steel edging is the most common metal edging, although you might not find it at local nurseries. Look for it at larger garden centers or at landscape suppliers, which is where most pros get it. (Search “Landscape Equipment and Supplies” online or in your Yellow Pages.) Steel edging comes in 4-in. wide by 10-ft. long strips in a variety of colors. Keep in mind that it’ll eventually rust, especially in a salt environment. It’s heavy, floppy stuff and needs almost full support when you transport it. Aluminum edging, besides being lighter and stiffer, won’t rust and is also available in a wide variety of colors. Look for it through landscaping suppliers, although it might be difficult to find. You might have to order it. Be sure stakes are included with your purchase. You’ll find black plastic edging at every garden center and home center, sometimes in both regular and heavy-duty thicknesses. Buy the thicker material. It better withstands those inevitable bumps and hard knocks that go with lawn mowing.
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Landscape Edging Borders

Steel edging is the most common metal edging, although you might not find it at local nurseries. Look for it at larger garden centers or at landscape suppliers, which is where most pros get it. (Search “Landscape Equipment and Supplies” online or in your Yellow Pages.) Steel edging comes in 4-in. wide by 10-ft. long strips in a variety of colors. Keep in mind that it’ll eventually rust, especially in a salt environment. It’s heavy, floppy stuff and needs almost full support when you transport it.
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Landscape Edging Borders

These garden edging ideas will show you that the potential for creating wonderful edging are endless! You can look for recycled materials around your house or yard and get creative with your vegetable or flower garden.  After seeing this variety of lawn edging, most likely you can come up with numerous ideas for your landscaping.  If so, the share your garden with us in the comments. To create an even growth of grass, you can use a lawn aerator. With an effective wheelbarrow, you can easily get your gardening tasks done in no time!
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Landscape Edging Borders

Metal edging is preferred by professional landscapers. It’s pliable, may be painted and lasts forever, but it’s expensive. If the soil is soft, install metal edging by laying it along the border of the garden bed and tapping it in place with a hammer, using a piece of board to cushion the blow. If the soil is hard, dig a shallow trench first, then lay the edging in the trench and fill with soil.
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Landscape Edging Borders

These simple, attractive borders will keep grass from invading your garden and eliminate the need for edge trimming. We’ll show you how to install metal, paver and stone borders. Not only do they look great, these borders require almost no maintenance.
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Landscape Edging Borders

To reduce maintenance we added a 4-in. deep trench that we lined with plastic edging and filled with mulch. The edging keeps grass roots from creeping into the stone wall, and the mulch provides a mowing track for the lawn mower wheels. With taller types of grass, you can mow right over the plastic border and cut the lawn edge cleanly. There’s no need to trim the grass.

A well defined edging, such as brick shown here, will show off and highlight a manicured lawn. It also helps edging easier and gives lawn a designer flair.
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Lawn and garden edging ideas can be anything as long as it can separate two distinct areas.  For instance, it can be a planter bed on one side and on the other are some gravel.  There are a plethora of styles that you can choose for your garden bordering materials.  When choosing a border, be sure to consider your budget, landscape, and creativity.  Choose the appropriate design since it can add dimension to your landscape.
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Also good to use for borders are conventional 2″ by 4″ pieces of lumber: redwood, cypress and cedar are good choices, but the longest-lasting, most rot-resistant wood is pressure-treated pine that’s rated for ground contact. The chemicals used to preserve the wood are safe for soil and plants, but it is recommended to wear a dust mask when cutting pressure-treated wood and gloves when handling it. These woods do a fine job at straight-line borders, but can’t handle curves.
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Use your imagination and be creative.  Fallen tree branches can be excellent materials for your garden edging.  When woven wood are used as a garden edge, it can create a beautiful and nuanced effect.  In order to have an old fashioned and rustic look, use natural logs.  It works best on vegetable gardens.
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When bricks are used in garden edging, it should be well placed in order to break up a big yard.  It can separate the area for plants, water features, and entertaining areas.
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Follow the photos for the basic installation techniques. The key to setting this border is to cut a clean vertical edge along the grass with a square spade (Photo 1). Then you can lay the border tightly against the edge when you stake and backfill it. There’s no rule for shaping the edge. Simply follow the edges of your lawn, making smooth, gradual curves. To make smooth, sharp curves, bend the edging around a circular form.
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Aluminum edging, besides being lighter and stiffer, won’t rust and is also available in a wide variety of colors. Look for it through landscaping suppliers, although it might be difficult to find. You might have to order it. Be sure stakes are included with your purchase.
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Both concrete and brick pavers make a simple, handsome border and work well as edging material too. They’re ideal when you want a wide border that keeps grass out of the garden, yet allows flowers and other plants to spill over without intruding onto the grass. You’re less likely to chop them up with the lawn mower.
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This project doesn’t require any special skills, just a strong back. Besides a good shovel and a wheelbarrow, you’ll need a cold chisel and a 2-lb.maul for breaking stones and driving edging stakes. Figure the cost at about $10 per foot of wall. Design your raised bed to blend into the contours of your yard like a natural feature. You can handle slopes in one of two ways. Either let your wall follow the slope of the yard for an informal look, or level the stones as we did and step the wall up or down as the slope requires to maintain approximately the same height.

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16 Photos of the "Landscape Edging Borders"

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