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Landscape Drainage Contractor

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Landscape Drainage Contractor

Our goal is to take our experience in installing hundreds of drainage systems over 20 years and apply that to your situation with what we calculate will be the most likely thing to fix your drainage issue, without spending a fortune. About 60% of the time, that initial drainage solution fixes the problem for our client, they are very happy and it stays that way for several years. However, the other 40% of the time, the drainage work we proposed and then installed maybe helped but did not totally solve the problem. Sometimes water is coming in from areas we didn’t expect it to be coming from. Again, we cannot see what’s going on underground. So while our first drainage mitigation effort may have helped, a second step is now needed. This is the most important thing to understand about drainage work – sometimes it’s a process. We may need additional drainage mitigation before your drainage issues are totally solved.
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Landscape Drainage Contractor

Landscape drainage issues are a constant challenge here in the Northwest with our clay soils and heavy rains. The solutions to drainage issues can be complex. Solutions we landscape drainage contractors in Portland have to mitigate can include re-grading of the landscape, soil amendments, the installation of catch basins, vent wells to protect water from entering a crawl space, channel drains, sump pumps, or re-routing / replacing rain drains or gutter drains. One the most frequent solution is the installation of a French drain or a series of French drains around key areas of your landscape. But first, it’s important to go over the drainage mitigation process.
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Landscape Drainage Contractor

Proper drainage is a critical part of your landscape that is often overlooked by inexperienced contractors. Virtually every one of our projects has a drainage component to it, so our designers are experienced drainage professionals. We offer a full range of drainage options, such as:
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Landscape Drainage Contractor

If you’re reading this page, chances are you have a drainage issue that is causing a lot of frustration. You may be dealing with some standing water, flooding issues, water in a crawl space or basement or landscape issues. We understand and we sympathize because we’ve seen it over and over again at our clients’ homes. We understand that you’re hoping someone will be able to come out and just have the perfect solution that will make that drainage problem just go away for good. Unfortunately, with drainage, it’s not always that simple. Sometimes, drainage mitigation is a process that sometimes takes several steps before you finally reach your desired result.
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Landscape Drainage Contractor

So in the case where the first drainage mitigation effort doesn’t completely solve all of your drainage issues and additional steps are needed, your project manager would come back out and re-assess the situation. If needed, he will get another person from our company to make sure we have thought of every option and we will propose a second step to mitigate the drainage. Although it’s rare, some sites take 3 or 4 steps before the drainage solution is fully reached. But it’s always best to start with what we think will solve the problem rather than take steps that may be unnecessary and costly.

Landscape Drainage Contractor

Typically, a civil engineer is the person that designs drainage and landscape contouring. The excavators and landscape contractors follow the plan from the engineer. This is in a perfect world of course. But always in developments and large projects. In your small application, you might find qualified help from a larger excavating contractor that has civil engineers on staff. They will want to see the problems, know the existing drainage system, take some soil core samples and look at adjoining properties. Don’t expect to have the services of a civil engineer come cheaply, but the results should give you peace of mind, and solve your problems.
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Landscape Drainage Contractor

We install a wide range of catch basins, sub-pumps, drainage swales, french drains and drain lines in an effort to re-route water. In addition to the immediate goal of re-routing water, we also make sure that each solution is aesthetically pleasing. After solving dozens of landscape drainage problems in Eugene Oregon, we are your local drainage experts.
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Landscape Drainage Contractor

Because we can’t see exactly what is happening underground, we can only make an educated guess, based on the problems that we’re shown, what we know of the soil and site conditions and our 20 years of drainage and landscape experience in doing drainage work. So the first step is to have one of our drainage experts come out and assess the situation and make a recommendation as to what would be the best place to start. Sometimes, the problem is seems pretty straight forward and the solution is also pretty straight forward. In many cases what we propose the first time fixes the problem and our client is happy.
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“Excellent Drainage Work. I hired them mainly to do a French drainage along a slope in my back yard to capture rain water and keep my backyard dryer, plus a few other drainage related minor enhancements. Lewis, the owner, is a great planner. The project started at the date as planned. They did it nice and quick, and the project is completed right before the first rain of the raining season. I would certainly call them again for other landscape projects.”
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Each year, dozens of homeowners in the Beaverton and SW Portland Oregon area hire Lewis Landscape Services to take care of their landscape drainage challenges. Over the years, we have developed a great deal of experience coming up with solutions to handle unique drainage challenges.
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As others have suggested, a good excavator or even a landscape contractor might be able to find relatively simple ways to alter the landscape of your yard so that water will naturally flow away from the home. Civil engineer would be your best bet but they are also expensive enough that I see them as the last ditch effort if other measures have been failing. Typically experienced landscape contractors or excavators can figure out where the water is flowing during a rainstorm and divert it away from the house with a bit of digging. French Drains While water may not be seeping into your foundation right now, having all of that water pool next to the house is inviting problems. Reagrdless of landscaping, it is a good idea to install french drains around the perimeter of your house if you know that rain water is inevitably flowing towards your home. The following image is a typical installation. The drain itself is typically a trench running a couple of feet typically from the house and going down below the frost line. You want the drain pipe to be deep enough that it will be below the frost line so that water flowing inside the pipe will not freeze and crack it. The frost line differs by region, obviously colder climates have a deeper frost line. The holes allow water to flow down or up into the pipe, while the pipe running at a slight downward slope will take the water and flow it away from the house in another direction. It typically sits on a thin bed of gravel and the trench is filled with gravel rather than soil as water will more easily flow down through to the drain pipe if the trench is filled with gravel rather than soil. Soil will also potentially clog the drain making it ineffective. For aesthetic reasons, sod can be placed over top or you can do something clever like make a rock garden. If you are a masochist and thoroughly enjoy pain, then you can grab a shovel and dig the trench, but for those of us who are lazy and like excuses to play with complicated equipment, you can rent a backhoe for a day and turn a week long digging job into a 2 hour weekend job. When digging however, be extremely careful about the location of underground utilities: Water lines Gas lines Sewer lines Electrical conduit Cable and telephone lines. Make sure to identify where these come into the house and approximate their location and depth in relation to where you intend to dig your trench. If any of them are close then it is probably best to call a professional just to be safe. Gutters and Downspouts Another possiblity could simply be that your gutter downspouts are draining too close to the house, or are draining into storm drains that have become clogged. The following is an example of a downspout draining too close to the foundation. Many times this can be fixed rather easily, by extending the downspout horizontally away from the house, or channelling it far enough away that it has somewhere to flow other than down your foundation walls. Check out your local hardware store because there is a number of ways to effectively and cheaply handle this. Also it is a good idea to check your gutters regularly for clogs. A clog can prevent water from flowing from your gutters to your downspouts, causing it to pour over the edge or sometimes down the side of the house. This is also something to check for. Downspouts can also sometimes flow into an underground drain, which can sometimes be the source of the problem. This drain typically will be a storm drain that flows away from the house or to a public storm drain. These can sometimes become clogged causing water to not flow properly away from the house. Most landscape contractors can easily help unclog such drains if you suspect that this might be the case. This should give you some ideas of things to look into or try before contacting a civil engineer, as the fix might be more manageable and less complicated than you think. And as far as a sinkhole swallowing your house, I have only ever heard of that happening because of a house sitting on top of a collapsed coal mine. If you live in a heavily mined area then your municipality probably has maps that will show whether your house sits overtop of an old mine. I wouldn’t personally worry about this. The cracks in your foundation might be from the ground settling or moving slightly from excessive soil saturation.

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