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Landscape Designer Job Description

landscape designer job description 1
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Landscape Designer Job Description

What Does a Landscape Designer Do? Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a landscape designer. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as details about training, job duties and licensure to find out if this is the career for you. Show Me Schools View 10 Popular Schools » View popular schools If you’re curious about the typical job duties of a landscape designer and how to become one, you might be interested to know that these professionals typically enter bachelor’s degree programs to learn the business and design skills needed to see a project through, from the initial drafting of a plan to budgeting and installation. Essential Information A landscape designer, sometimes called a landscape architect, creates attractive, functional outdoor spaces for homeowners, businesses, schools and other organizations. Most landscape architects hold at least a bachelor’s degree in the field. Additionally, most states require landscape designers to be licensed, which requires passing the Landscape Architect Registration Exam. Required Education Bachelor’s degree in landscape architecture recommended; master’s degrees are available; completion of an internship Other Requirements State licensing required in most states Projected Job Growth (2014-2024) 5% for all landscape architects* Median Salary $63,810 for landscape architects* Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Job Duties Overview Many landscape designers own their own businesses, while others work at larger firms or as consultants at plant nurseries. Still others work for government bodies. Some of a landscape designer’s job duties vary by industry, but drawing plans, selecting plants and installing structures like walkways and water features are important tasks in most landscape jobs. According to The LandLovers, an organization that promotes jobs in the landscape industry, landscape designers draw plans using LandCAD or by hand drawing. They contract installation staff to put in garden beds and build structures. Landscape designers may meet clients on-site to discuss the requirements of the space. To keep the business profitable, they must create project estimates and maintain budgets. Job Duties by Industry Independent Designers According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), a landscape designer or architect who owns his or her own business either works alone or with hired employees and assistants. He or she completes all aspects of landscape design projects and maintains the business. Independent landscape designers spend some of their time on paperwork, bookkeeping and marketing as well as meeting with clients and creating design plans. Design and Architecture Firms Landscape designers who work for landscape design or landscape architecture firms sometimes assist senior designers or architects, working on one or more aspects of a larger design. The BLS says that landscape architects typically work on larger projects and sometimes hire landscape designers to work with them. Government Organizations A search for government landscape design positions revealed that many cities and states seek landscape designers. They could assist in the planting of roadsides and road partitions. Landscape designers also plan parks and recreation areas, and they create user-friendly spaces near government buildings and other public spaces. Plant Nurseries Many garden centers and nurseries offer landscape design consultation services to their clients. A landscape designer working in this capacity sometimes sketches design ideas for customers or works on large designs and installation jobs for clients of the nursery. Their duties include suggesting plants, furniture and irrigation systems to walk-in homeowners. They may also conduct site visits and create plans for large design projects. A landscape designer designs and beautifies outdoor landscapes. They have opportunities to own their own business or work for design firms, government organizations and nurseries. They usually work face-to-face with clients and contract workers to do the planting and installation. Find the perfect school Select your current education level High School/GED Select One Completed HS Still in HS Undergraduate Select One Pursuing Undergrad Associates degree Bachelors degree Graduate Select One Pursuing Graduate Masters degree
landscape designer job description 1

Landscape Designer Job Description

All states require landscape architects to be licensed, except for Illinois, Massachusetts, Maine, and the District of Columbia. In addition, all 50 states (but not the District of Columbia) require applicants to be licensed before they can use the title “landscape architect” and start soliciting business. Licensing requirements vary among states, but usually include a degree in landscape architecture from an accredited school, internship experience, and a passing score on the Landscape Architect Registration Exam. Education A bachelor’s or master’s degree in landscape architecture usually is necessary for entry into the profession. There are two undergraduate landscape architect professional degrees: a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (BLA) and a Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture (BSLA). These programs usually require 4 years of study. Accredited programs are approved by the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB). Those with an undergraduate degree in a field other than landscape architecture can enroll in a Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) graduate degree program, which typically takes 3 years of full-time study. Courses typically include surveying, landscape design and construction, landscape ecology, site design, and urban and regional planning. Other courses include history of landscape architecture, plant and soil science, geology, professional practice, and general management. The design studio is a key component of any curriculum. Whenever possible, students are assigned real projects, providing them with valuable hands-on experience. While working on these projects, students become proficient in the use of computer-aided design and drafting (CADD), model building, and other design software. Training In order to become licensed, candidates must meet experience requirements determined by each state. A list of training requirements can be found at the Council of Landscape Architectural Registration Boards. New hires are called apprentices or intern landscape architects until they become licensed. Although duties vary with the type and size of the employing firm, all interns must work under the supervision of a licensed landscape architect for the experience to count towards licensure. In addition, all drawings and specifications must be signed and sealed by the licensed landscape architect. Some employers recommend that prospective landscape architects complete an internship with a landscape architecture firm during their educational studies. Interns can improve their technical skills and gain an understanding of the day-to-day operations of the business, including how to win clients, generate fees, and work within a budget. Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations All states require landscape architects to be licensed in order to practice except for Illinois, Massachusetts, Maine, and the District of Columbia. In addition, all 50 states (but not the District of Columbia) require applicants to be licensed before they can use the title “landscape architect” and start soliciting business. Licensing is based on the Landscape Architect Registration Examination (L.A.R.E.), which is sponsored by the Council of Landscape Architectural Registration Boards. Candidates can take the L.A.R.E. at different times of the year. Those interested in taking the exam usually need a degree from an accredited school and 1 to 4 years of work experience under the supervision of a licensed landscape architect, although standards vary by state. For those without an accredited landscape architecture degree, many states provide alternative paths to qualify to take the L.A.R.E., usually requiring more work experience. Currently, 13 states require landscape architects to pass a state exam, in addition to the L.A.R.E., to satisfy registration requirements. State exams focus on laws, environmental regulations, plants, soils, climate, and other characteristics unique to the state. Because requirements for licensure vary, landscape architects may find it difficult to transfer their registration from one state to another. Common requirements include graduating from an accredited program, completing 3 years of an internship under the supervision of a registered landscape architect, and passing the L.A.R.E. By meeting national requirements, a landscape architect can also obtain certification from the Council of Landscape Architectural Registration Boards. That certification can be useful in getting a license in another state. Important Qualities Analytical skills. Landscape architects need to understand the content of designs. When designing a building’s drainage system, for example, landscape architects need to understand how the building’s location and surrounding land affect each other. Communication skills. Landscape architects share their ideas, both orally and in writing, with clients, other architects, and workers who help prepare drawings. Many landscape architects also give presentations to explain their designs. Creativity. Landscape architects create the overall look of gardens, parks, and other outdoor areas. Designs should be both pleasing to the eye and functional. Problem-solving skills. When designing outdoor spaces, landscape architects must be able to provide solutions to unanticipated challenges. These solutions often involve looking at the challenge from many perspectives. Technical skills. Landscape architects use computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) programs to create representations of their projects. Some also must use geographic information systems (GIS) for their designs. Visualization skills. Landscape architects must be able to imagine how an overall outdoor space will look once complete.
landscape designer job description 2

Landscape Designer Job Description

If you’re curious about the typical job duties of a landscape designer and how to become one, you might be interested to know that these professionals typically enter bachelor’s degree programs to learn the business and design skills needed to see a project through, from the initial drafting of a plan to budgeting and installation. Essential Information A landscape designer, sometimes called a landscape architect, creates attractive, functional outdoor spaces for homeowners, businesses, schools and other organizations. Most landscape architects hold at least a bachelor’s degree in the field. Additionally, most states require landscape designers to be licensed, which requires passing the Landscape Architect Registration Exam. Required Education Bachelor’s degree in landscape architecture recommended; master’s degrees are available; completion of an internship Other Requirements State licensing required in most states Projected Job Growth (2014-2024) 5% for all landscape architects* Median Salary $63,810 for landscape architects* Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Job Duties Overview Many landscape designers own their own businesses, while others work at larger firms or as consultants at plant nurseries. Still others work for government bodies. Some of a landscape designer’s job duties vary by industry, but drawing plans, selecting plants and installing structures like walkways and water features are important tasks in most landscape jobs. According to The LandLovers, an organization that promotes jobs in the landscape industry, landscape designers draw plans using LandCAD or by hand drawing. They contract installation staff to put in garden beds and build structures. Landscape designers may meet clients on-site to discuss the requirements of the space. To keep the business profitable, they must create project estimates and maintain budgets. Job Duties by Industry Independent Designers According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), a landscape designer or architect who owns his or her own business either works alone or with hired employees and assistants. He or she completes all aspects of landscape design projects and maintains the business. Independent landscape designers spend some of their time on paperwork, bookkeeping and marketing as well as meeting with clients and creating design plans. Design and Architecture Firms Landscape designers who work for landscape design or landscape architecture firms sometimes assist senior designers or architects, working on one or more aspects of a larger design. The BLS says that landscape architects typically work on larger projects and sometimes hire landscape designers to work with them. Government Organizations A search for government landscape design positions revealed that many cities and states seek landscape designers. They could assist in the planting of roadsides and road partitions. Landscape designers also plan parks and recreation areas, and they create user-friendly spaces near government buildings and other public spaces. Plant Nurseries Many garden centers and nurseries offer landscape design consultation services to their clients. A landscape designer working in this capacity sometimes sketches design ideas for customers or works on large designs and installation jobs for clients of the nursery. Their duties include suggesting plants, furniture and irrigation systems to walk-in homeowners. They may also conduct site visits and create plans for large design projects. A landscape designer designs and beautifies outdoor landscapes. They have opportunities to own their own business or work for design firms, government organizations and nurseries. They usually work face-to-face with clients and contract workers to do the planting and installation.

Landscape Designer Job Description

Landscape Designer Job Description
Landscape Designer Job Description
Landscape Designer Job Description
Landscape Designer Job Description

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