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Juvet Landscape Hotel

juvet landscape hotel 1
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Juvet Landscape Hotel

menu The Juvet HotelThe Hotel, the History, & the ArchitectureThe Juvet SeasonsExplore the four seasons at Juvet Landscape HotelThe Juvet Tailor-madeCompany Workshops, Weddings & Private CelebrationsBooking & InfoBooking, Prices, Facilities & How to get there The Hotel Architecture Early History The making of Juvet   Gallery Map Booking    The HotelJuvet Landscape Hotel – a synthesis of raw Norwegian nature, cultural history and modern architecture. The first landscape hotel in Europe is situated in the farmstead of Burtigarden farm at Alstad in Valldal, on a steep, natural levee amongst birch, aspen, pine and age-old boulders. In this little village in rural Norway, modern architecture encounters the natural and cultural landscape – and shows that the modern and innovative can go hand in hand with local building traditions and good, old-fashioned craftsmanship. Unique roomsThe hotel consists of nine detached rooms that are sited separately, each with a unique perspective on the rugged landscape. In addition, there is the opportunity to stay in the old buildings on the farm – the mill house, the barn and the authentically restored farmhouse – while meals are served communally in the old barn.  The seven first landscape roomsThe seven first landscape rooms are double rooms, built individually into the landscape. The architects Jensen & Skodvin envisioned a landscape hotel that would blend in with the natural environment. The result is seven small “cubes” on stilts, with glass walls that offer each space a striking view of the valley, the river, the courtyard or the dramatic gorge below. It captures the feeling of being in a lean-to – whilst being far more luxurious. While no two rooms are alike, all the rooms have a dark interior to avoid stealing focus from the scenery. Apart from the little bathroom, of course. Here the sun shines even in the middle of the winter! «I’m entirely too modest to walk around naked, even when I’m alone. But the first thing I wanted to do after closing the door of my cabin at the Juvet Landscape Hotel was shed anything that separated me from nature.» Steve – guest and journalist from the US, Afar Magazine  The “birdhouses”The two new single rooms – or “birdhouses” – are fashioned in a more minimalist architectural style than the first landscape rooms, constructed in the manner of the “stabburet”, a traditional Norwegian log house originally used as a food store. The structures resemble birdhouses gently placed on the steep slopes above the other landscape rooms. We have tried to highlight how little we actually need to achieve a sense of well-being. The rooms are no bigger than 8 square metres in total, but provide a comfortable bed, a small sofa bench, a shower and a toilet. The interior is light and pleasant, with large windows designed to let nature in. Smaller windows provide stunning glimpses of the world outside. From the bed, you can look out on the mountainside, just centimetres away. This close to nature, perhaps you can even see the moss growing?  Spa areaThe bathing area is a tranquil and refreshing spa built into the land by the river, invisible from the farmyard, but still only a few short steps away. It is a welcome bliss to relax here after a skiing trip or a walk – or perhaps after a long journey. The spa area itself is in dark concrete, but the small rooms are painted in beautiful colours to conjure up the impression of being in a cave. The facade is a 15 metre-long glass sheet facing the flowing river as it winds its way up under Juvet. It is as though the river is graciously greeting us here while en route towards the fjord 15 kilometres below. The bathing facilities include Steam room Showers and dressing rooms Outdoor hot tub Relaxation area with open fireplace for formal and informal gatherings Quiet room where you can enjoy the river running by  The farmhouseWe don’t rent out the old farmhouse to individuals. This venue is mainly used for large gatherings, such as weddings, anniversaries, company gatherings or other arrangements for guests with a common interest during their stay.We are just as proud of having taken care of the old farmhouse as we are of having created new buildings. This enables us to showcase an important share of the cultural history of this part of Norway. The farmhouse was built in the 1870s, and it was a major challenge to restore it to its authentic, former appearance. Luckily, we discovered a photograph from around 1880, which enabled us to recreate the original style of the exterior. While we have stayed true to the traditional style, we have modified the house’s interior so that it also meets the requirements of a modern, functional dwelling. The farmhouse has a kitchen, bathroom and several bedrooms. The barn The 100 year-old farm building in Burtigarden has been restored and rebuilt, giving the old rooms new functions: The cow byre is a dining room and sitting room with an open fire. The pigsty is the kitchen. There are premises for parties and dancing in the barn. The old hay store where feed for animals used to be stored has been turned into a “lounge” area. The mountain cabinThe newly located old mountain cabin in the orchard has beds for two people. The people who tended the cattle, goats and sheep in days gone by lived in cabins or chalets like these when they were up at the summer mountain pasture. They were sometimes very young – some of the girls were not more than ten years old when they were tasked with this important job. Transhumance farming was once vital to the farm economy, but times have changed and the practice ceased around 1950. The mill houseThe smallest house on the farm is the mill house, where grain was milled in times gone by. It is a modest space, at just two square metres, but features a lovely bed with space for one or two people and not much else. The old mill house is located down by the river in Stamphølen and has perhaps the most exclusive view of all the rooms on the farm. You can lie here with the door open and watch Valldøla River gurgle by just a few metres away. The mountain cabin and mill house have no electricity or running water. All rooms have WiFi.    
juvet landscape hotel 1

Juvet Landscape Hotel

Courtesy of A24.There are many stunning, otherworldly sights in Ex Machina, the science-fiction film directed by Alex Garland that features a robot so lifelike she’s played by actress Alicia Vikander. But the most breathtaking sight of all may be the 100 percent real, available-for-a-night’s-stay location where the film is set: the Juvet Landscape Hotel in Norway.According to Ex Machina’s production designer Mark Digby, it took a full-on global hunt to find the Juvet, which stands in for much of the modernist, remote hideout of tech billionaire Nathan (Oscar Isaac). “We wanted it to be among nature, we wanted it to be stunning, and we wanted it to be exclusive,” says Digby, who was given a script that originally placed Nathan’s estate in Colorado. After hunting all over Europe, from the Alps to Finland, the team finally noticed a house under construction on the side of a mountain in northern Norway—and, half an hour away, the Juvet Landscape Hotel. Nathan’s mansion had been found, in the form of two separate, modernist buildings.The exterior of one of the buildings at the Juvet Hotel. By Jiri Havran/Courtesy of Juvet HotelWhen Domhnall Gleeson’s Caleb, a lowly programmer at Nathan’s tech behemoth Blue Book, arrives for a week at his boss’s estate, what’s impressive about the mansion is how initially unimpressive it is. Looking at first like a plain brown box stuck in the woods, the space gives way at first to a bright, modernist living room—part of that house that Digby’s team initially found—and then a vast subterranean space, most of it re-created on soundstages in England. The hotel supplied the dining room with expansive views and several other sleek interior spaces. “He is so rich he doesn’t need to be ostentatious with it,” Digby says of Nathan and the home he stitched together for the character. “We felt someone as powerful, as rich as this, and as intellectually competent as him, would have a good sense of design.”The living room, located in a private home, that serves as the entrance to Nathan’s house. Courtesy of A24.That includes the modernist furniture, the kitchen stacked with sleek gadgets, and even the Jackson Pollock replica on the wall. “We chose an eclectic range of mid-20th century designs I think that are classic and everlasting,” says Digby, describing Nathan as a man who collects things, whether artifacts from around the world or ideas from employees like Caleb. “I don’t think he feels that things have to be up to date, it just has to be beautiful design.” Though Ex Machina is clearly set in a near future in which artificial intelligence is possible, it rarely feels explicitly futuristic; aside from some biometric keypads and computer programs, nearly everything in the house aside from robot Ava could exist today. “You need people to engage—they have to feel that they could be there and it could happen,” Digby explains. “We thought very hard about that.”Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson) and Nathan (Oscar Isaac) on the deck outside the Juvet Landscape Hotel. Courtesy of A24.The clean lines of the furniture, gleaming windows, and spectacular views make Nathan’s home incredibly appealing, as if the placid and tasteful surface is there to distract you from something dark roiling underneath. “We have to be slightly on edge about the perfection and purity and brilliance of it all,” Digby explains. “We wanted it to be slightly at odds with comfort.” Which makes it all the more surprising when, in one of the film’s most talked-about moments, Nathan’s concrete-walled lounge transforms into a disco, of all things. How did Digby install disco lights in the walls that we, and Caleb, wouldn’t notice? “With difficulty,” he says. In the concrete walls of the room Digby added a criss-cross pattern, behind which he and his team could hide flashing disco lights. “We needed this party environment, but did he have a separate party room? It needed to be something structural, something artistic, that would then turn into a disco environment. And disco environments are all about light.”Nathan flips the switch for the disco wall. Courtesy of A24.Like any good sci-fi film, Ex Machina is rich with metaphors, mining Caleb and Nathan’s fraught relationships with the robot Ava to explore humanity’s tenuous relationship to nature and technology. The production design is rich with those metaphors, too, including several spaces in which the wild forest surrounding the house is incorporated within the walls. “We want a constant reminder conflict for the audience and for everyone, including Caleb and Nathan,” Digby says. “The man-made, and the natural environment. Which is what is happening with Ava—she is man-made, but of nature.”Ava (Alicia Vikander) in the subterranean hallway built for the film. Courtesy of A24.ShareEmailFacebookTwitterKatey RichKatey Rich is the deputy editor of VanityFair.com.

Juvet Landscape Hotel

Juvet Landscape Hotel

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