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Indoor Vegetable Gardening

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Indoor Vegetable Gardening

Grow an indoor vegetable garden and enjoy your own fresh organic vegetables. What to know for starting vegetable gardens indoors from seeds. Get indoor vegetable growing tips, growing under lights, fertilizer.
indoor vegetable gardening 1

Indoor Vegetable Gardening

Indoor Vegetable Gardening: 37 Edibles You Can Grow Indoors In The Winter – As a prepper, one of the essential skills is for you to be able to sustain yourself and have food available to you the whole year, if and when you need it. One way of achieving this, is through an indoor vegetable garden. It doesn’t take up a lot of space and, more importantly, is able to function entirely inside.
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Indoor Vegetable Gardening

Commonly grown as a salad green, arugula is a vegetable that pairs well with pots and indoor gardening. You can use any type of pot or container, the only requirement is to provide sufficient drainage. For this reason, pay attention to choose a pot that has a large amount of holes in the bottom.
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Indoor Vegetable Gardening

Beets Beets are not only a colorful addition to your plate, they are also nutritionally heavy in vitamins and minerals. Easy to grow, beets are the perfect vegetable to grow for a beginning gardener as the plants are tolerant of many different growing environments. This delicious root is a great choice for indoor gardening and will deliver a nice, fulfilling, product.
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Indoor Vegetable Gardening

Beets are not only a colorful addition to your plate, they are also nutritionally heavy in vitamins and minerals. Easy to grow, beets are the perfect vegetable to grow for a beginning gardener as the plants are tolerant of many different growing environments. This delicious root is a great choice for indoor gardening and will deliver a nice, fulfilling, product.
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Indoor Vegetable Gardening

A tasty vegetable and a medicinal herb, asparagus is one plant you might want to grow in your indoors mini-garden. Before deciding if you want to grow this vegetable, you should know that asparagus is not a plant meant to be grown indoors. This can be achieved, but it will shorten the lifespan of the plant.
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Indoor Vegetable Gardening

I live in Baltimore and maintain lots of container plants in my ‘concrete’ backyard. I am also on my second year at an allotment garden plot (10′ x 15′), through a program administered by the city. Ten yeas ago I wanted nothing to do with gardening, but I’ve really developed sort of a green thumb. Baltimore is blessed with good sunshine and usually good rainfall. I also water the vegetables in my containers with water collected in a basement dehumidifier, and flowers with dishwater after it’s cooled (careful not to use dishwater after eating a meal that contained meat). Containers are a great way to get started, can be bountiful, and you can begin your new avocation in small steps. Begin with a couple or few pots, then add some every Spring as time and schedule allow. A few perennials, like strawberries, spearmint (think tabbouleh or sauteed with yellow squash or zucchini and garlic), and possibly rosemary will impress you with a return every year. Buy sturdy pots, good potting soil, and add some slow fertilizer to each pot, like bone meal. Water but don’t over-water. Pay attention to the needs of your plants and move according to each container’s requirement for sunshine. Regarding edible plants, I recommend you start with herbs. I’ve only met a few people who couldn’t grow basil and such. I transplanted a Genovese (or sweet) basil seedling from a big box store in 2006. The basil volunteered in the same pot the next year, and I’ve planted larger quantities of basil from seeds I gather from those plants every Fall. Don’t discount herbs as merely flavorings, basil is essential for making pesto and Insalata Caprese. Another suggestion is to try potting some strawberry seedlings. I planted several ‘All-Star’ variety strawberry seedlings (also in 2006) and have had them thrive every year, producing five or six dozen delicious strawberries every Spring. Be patient, sometimes strawberries need some time to ‘pop’, and a lot depends on the variety you select to grow. Neither of these recommendations will put a ton of food on your table, but you are likely to grow them with relative ease. It’s important to start small with plants that provide a pleasant reward. The treat of a handful of fresh strawberries or the aroma of freshly made pesto will inspire you to try something new in your container garden every spring. This year I am trying potatoes in containers (adding straw as the plants grow taller), leaf lettuce, scallions, cilantro, dill, and purple basil. Best of luck and happy gardening!
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Nevertheless, there are alternative solutions if you want to eat your organic veggies no matter where you live. If you don’t have a garden where to build a greenhouse, you can create your own indoor vegetable garden by simply using pots and seeds of your favorite vegetables.
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Swiss chard can be used to add flavor to your sandwiches and salads, the crispy leaves of this plant being rich in nutrients. Indoors, it is possible to grow baby Swiss chard in plastic trays or containers.You can choose a variety that is suitable for indoor gardening, such as golden chard, magenta sunset or ruby rose Swiss chard.You will be able to harvest the crops in about two weeks.
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Parsnip is one of the vegetables that don’t pair well with the indoor gardening . However, if you have some patience and determination, you can still grow your own parsnip from the comfort of your home.
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City dwellers, or those without a good gardening spot in the yard, may find growing indoors especially useful. Plants don’t need to take up much space — a windowsill is fine if that’s all you have. For others, the indoor garden may become starter plants for an outdoor garden come spring.
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Instead of growing indoor plants in a soil mixture, you may want to try out hydroponics. Basically, this means gardening without soil. Soil holds nutrients and anchors plants roots. When growing hydroponically you provide the nutrients directly. Instead of being bound up in soil, the nutrients are readily available to the plants.
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Mandarin Oranges Growing mandarin oranges in pots can be tricky for two reasons: adequately sized pot and sufficient sunlight. Indoor mandarin trees will grow more like a shrub instead of a tree, but should be treated as any other indoor potted tree. You can expect a sweet and flavorful fruit in about 12 months, but that is simply an estimate and may take longer.
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Growing mandarin oranges in pots can be tricky for two reasons: adequately sized pot and sufficient sunlight. Indoor mandarin trees will grow more like a shrub instead of a tree, but should be treated as any other indoor potted tree. You can expect a sweet and flavorful fruit in about 12 months, but that is simply an estimate and may take longer.
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To keep vegetable plants growing, feed them organic soil amendments, like liquid seaweed, fish emulsion, or manure tea, weekly. To ensure growth, vegetables need consistently moist soil. 
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Just like bell peppers, hot peppers are another type of vegetable that can be grown indoors in the winter. The conditions are similar to those required by the bell peppers, but you can use smaller pots.

Rich in iron and other nutritive elements, spinach is a vegetable that shouldn’t miss from a balanced diet. If you want to eat your own organic spinach this winter, know that growing it indoors is simple and fun.
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5. Hot peppers Just like bell peppers, hot peppers are another type of vegetable that can be grown indoors in the winter. The conditions are similar to those required by the bell peppers, but you can use smaller pots.
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Conservatories and windowsills are good sites for growing vegetables. Put heavy containers on the floor or a firm support. Some vegetable plants, including trailing species, are suitable for growing in hanging baskets fitted with integral drip trays. Mushrooms are straightforward if you have space in a dark cupboard. Some plants such as chicory and rhubarb can be forced to produce their crop earlier than normal.Tomatoes, peppers and eggplant: These easily raised tender crops are favorites for a sunny windowsill and can be grown from seed or small plantlets. For window boxes or hanging baskets, choose pendent varieties such as Tumbler tomatoes. Train cordon varieties such as Sweet Million tomatoes up canes or string in a conservatory, where they will produce long trusses of tasty, decorative tomatoes for several months. Peppers and aubergines are less prolific.

This vegetable of the onion family commonly called bunching onions is grown mainly for the leaves. It is available in shops as small bunches of greens carrying immature bulbs, but when you grow them at home, you can just snip off the greens. Onions have a long growing season, so it is a good idea to grow scallions in containers which can be kept outside until mid-fall and then shifted inside as the temperature falls. This ensures a regular supply of green onions throughout winter.

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