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Home Depot Landscape

home depot landscape 1
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Home Depot Landscape

There’s nothing better for adding an elegant, magical ambiance to your backyard or deck than outdoor lighting. It’s great, too, for enhancing curb appeal in the front of your house. Landscape lighting increases your home security, too. Installing your own DIY landscape lighting is pretty easy, too. DIY blogger Robin Gay of All Things Heart and Home has done some pretty amazing things with outdoor lighting in her yard. Here she shows up how to set up a DIY  outdoor lighting system. Outdoor living before the sun goes down is lovely. But add a little landscape lighting and moonlight to the mix and you’ve got an enchanting backdrop for all your outside celebrations! If you’d like to add some DIY landscape lighting to your outdoor living area, I’d love to show you how we did ours! Adding DIY Landscaping Lights First, decide on a plan- Consider what you’d like to accent. Some questions to get you started… What part of  your yard, flower beds, water features or trees would you like illuminated?  Do you want a light mounted in a tree shining down onto a particular area? (These give a moonlight effect and are so pretty when shining onto a garden area.) Do you have a space (eating area, fire pit) that would benefit from string lights? We decided to uplight a few trees and add lighting to the garden area surrounding our water feature. We also added a giant criss-cross of string lights over the fire pit. Let’s start with the up-lights… Materials for this DIY Landscaping Light Project LED Spotlights Low Voltage Power Pack Low Voltage Electrical Wire (the amount depends on your lighting plan) Electrical Wire Strippers Phillips Screwdriver Cement Anchors or Wood Screws to Mount Your Power Pack Step 1 Assemble the lights according to the directions. Step 2 Place the lights in the locations that you’ve chosen in your plan. Step 3 Find an outdoor electrical outlet close to the space you’re working on, and mount the power pack close to the outlet. We used cement  anchors  for brick, but you can use wood screws for mounting to the side of your house. DO NOT PLUG POWER PACK INTO POWER SOURCE YET. Step 4 Take one end of your wire and lay it at the farthest light from the power pack. Now, lay the wire from light to light until you make your way to the power pack-don’t pull the wire tight. (Keep in mind you’ll want to bury or cover the wire later, so keep the wire in pine/mulch islands or around the perimeter of your lawn.) Step 5 Connect wire to the power pack by taking the power pack off the wall … Using wire strippers, strip the wires as shown. Attach the stripped wires to the terminals on the back of the power pack.  Now put your power pack back on the wall. DO NOT PLUG POWER PACK INTO POWER SOURCE YET. Step 6 Connect the wires at each light location according to your instructions. Step 7 Stick your lights back into the ground! Step 8 Plug the power pack into power source and set automatic timer according to instructions. Step 9 Go back through your yard and cover the electrical wire with pine straw or mulch if it’s located in a bed, or you can dig a  shallow trench to bury the wire. Once your lights are working, wait till dusk and make sure your lights are pointing in the right direction. Adjust as necessary! Adding String Lights Now for another layer of ambiance using string lights! Materials needed to add string lights Screw Eyes Wire Rope (1/16 inch) – The amount depends on how many lights you’ll be hanging. The rope serves as support for using multiple strings of lights over a large area.You won’t need wire rope if you’re hanging just a few lights. Turn Buckle With a Hook and an Eye Wire Rope Clip Pliers String Lights Zip Ties If you haven’t done so already, now’s the time to decide where you want your string lights. Also consider exactly where you’ll attach them. We decided to attach ours onto our decking and a few trees, creating a  criss-cross pattern over the fire pit and waterfall. If you don’t have trees or decking available, you could easily install poles or for a temporary solution…like maybe if you’ll be throwing a bunch of parties this summer, you could put poles into weighted buckets! Step 1 When you decide on where and how you’ll hang your lights, add screw eyes and connect the cable to the eye. Secure with the wire rope clip. Tighten the nuts. Step 2 Take the other end of the cable to the corresponding tree or pole you’re using to attach your lights. Extend the turn buckle by spinning the center and run the cable through the eye. Place the wire rope clip on the cable but don’t tighten. Attach the hook end of the turn buckle to the eye you put in the tree or pole, then pull the slack out of the cable to tighten. Secure the wire rope clip. The turn buckle can now be adjusted to tighten the entire length of the cable. (Ours was 70 feet, so we needed extra tension to keep the lights from sagging in the center.) Step 3 Now it’s time to hang your lights! Plug the first set of string lights into your extension cord to test and begin hanging the lights on the cable with zip ties. Continue to connect your lights and hang them with the zip ties.  Remember,  don’t connect more than the recommended number of strings. I like them even in the daylight, but when the sun starts to go down… …these little string lights…  …add a whole lot of atmosphere! Adding another easy layer of outdoor lighting can be fun, like these beautiful lanterns from Home Depot. (When you use a battery operated candle, the candle can be set to come on at the same time your landscape lights flicker on!) It’s easy to give your outdoor space a soft inviting glow that will keep you spending your nights under the stars right up until that first freeze! Browse The Home Depot’s Outdoor Lighting Department for everything you need to install landscape lighting.
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Home Depot Landscape

Weekend 10 simple landscape design tricks to boost curb appeal and make your yard beautiful Landscaping requires ongoing effort to keep your plants and flowers looking great season after season. Your hard work will be well-rewarded if you follow these 10 landscaping tips that you can start implementing your own yard today. Tips: • Break up sections of your landscape with different colors or textures using ornamental grasses, perennials and plants that grow to different heights. • Avoid planting flowers and plants close together as your layout may become overgrown and crowded in a year. Space plants 1 to 3 feet apart, and trim as they grow. • Use color to create focal points in areas that you would like to highlight, such as a sitting area, gazebo or front entry. • Use flowers or other types of plants that grow higher closer to your home, and plants that grow to lower heights in front of them so they are visible. However, avoid planting large-growing plants in front of windows to avoid a potential uprooting project in the future. • Use evergreen shrubs as a foundation plant rather than deciduous shrubs. • Use landscaping accessories to break up your yard, such as boulders, birdbaths or benches. WHAT YOU NEED FOR THIS PROJECT Lawn mower Chalk spray Hose Twine Lawn fertilizer Weed killer Shovel Hoe Tape measure Stump remover Plants and trees (as desired) Landscape rocks Outdoor decor TOOLS Lawn mower Chalk spray Hose Twine Lawn fertilizer Weed killer Shovel Hoe Tape measure Stump remover MATERIALS Plants and trees (as desired) Landscape rocks Outdoor decor 1 If you’re a beginner, keep it simple • Use informal hedges and flowers that require less pruning. • Opt for more grass and fewer flowerbeds, or create a rock garden. • Ask an associate at your local store for ground cover varieties that can provide greenery that rarely needs mowing. 2 Think of your landscaping in terms of the big picture • Don’t randomly place flowers and plants on a whim. • Avoid scattered placements so that you don’t end up with a mismatched or cluttered look. 3 Outline your layout Use chalk spray, hoses or twine to lay out your landscape patterns before breaking ground. 4 Don’t cut your grass too short • Keep your lawn 2 to 3 inches tall, which is typically the highest setting on most push mowers. • Removing more than one-third of the grass blades leads to shorter root systems and moisture depletion. • Weeds germinate more when grass is not tall enough to shade them out. • Combat any brown, patchy spots by reseeding and adding fertilizer. Learn more in our Overseeding Project Guide. 5 Don’t ignore weeds • If you see a dandelion or crab grass, break out the weed killer spray to attack the roots so new weeds won’t sprout up. • Barren patches in your lawn are perfect spots for weeds to grow, so use a fertilizer on them with built-in weed control. 6 Don’t put the wrong plant in the wrong place • Make sure you choose plants that are suited to your area’s climate. • Check the plant tags for advice on hardiness, height, spacing, feeding, watering and light preferences. • Picture the plant five years into the future. How tall is it? How wide is it? Does it fill the allotted space? If not, pick another plant. 7 Don’t overshadow smaller plants • Do not overshadow smaller plants. • When choosing areas for plants, think tall to small. Start with taller plants, and gradually fill out your landscaping area with smaller plants. Don’t place sun-loving plants in the path of taller neighbors. • Remember that fast-growing plants may block the sun with their large size, so place shade-loving plants facing north. 8 Be careful planting near utilities Roots can penetrate tiny gaps in underground pipes and cause major damage. Know exactly where your electric, phone, cable and gas lines are before planting. Call your local utility companies before you dig to ensure safety. 9 Don’t plant too close to your home’s foundation • What looks like a tiny sapling may sprout roots that can grow up to three times the height of a tree. A tree planted near your home can cause cracks in your foundation, leading to costly repairs. • Plant medium or large trees 30 to 50 feet away from the house, and small trees 15 feet away. 10 Don’t settle for what is already growing • If you have an overgrown or outdated landscape, there is nothing wrong with removing shrubs, hedges, plants or flowers, especially if they are too big for a particular area. • A great way to uproot unwanted greenery is with Stump-Out, which works in four to six weeks. At that time, finish the job with a shovel and a hoe to cut roots below the surface.•

Home Depot Landscape

Home Depot Landscape
Home Depot Landscape
Home Depot Landscape
Home Depot Landscape
Home Depot Landscape

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