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Grasses For Landscaping

grasses for landscaping 1
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Grasses For Landscaping

Next Up Maiden Grass, Eulalia Learn more about maiden grass and its environment. Growing Low-Maintenance Moss Once established, moss requires no watering, no mowing, no fertilizing and no weeding. Consider Verbena This easy care plant is a real crowd-pleaser. Permaculture Helps You Garden Smarter Learn how to create a low-maintenance landscape in perfect harmony with its environment. In the Weeds: St. John’s Wort Add this beautiful, hardy plant to your garden design. Our Favorite Ornamental Grasses Add some of these go-with-the-flow grasses to your garden for extra interest throughout the growing season. Sow Ornamental Grasses From Seed Very fashionable and extremely versatile, annual grasses are easy to grow from seed, and can be used in wild, meadow-style plantings, as well as container designs. Drought- and Heat-Tolerant Annuals Stock your garden with drought-tolerant annuals that come into their own just as summer starts to sizzle. A Guide to Ornamental Garden Grasses Add color and style to your garden space with this guide to planting ornamental grasses.  Ornamental Grasses for Every Situation Choose the ornamental grass based on the season, the height and the type of soil.
grasses for landscaping 1

Grasses For Landscaping

Maiden Grass, Eulalia Learn more about maiden grass and its environment. Growing Low-Maintenance Moss Once established, moss requires no watering, no mowing, no fertilizing and no weeding. Consider Verbena This easy care plant is a real crowd-pleaser. Permaculture Helps You Garden Smarter Learn how to create a low-maintenance landscape in perfect harmony with its environment. In the Weeds: St. John’s Wort Add this beautiful, hardy plant to your garden design. Our Favorite Ornamental Grasses Add some of these go-with-the-flow grasses to your garden for extra interest throughout the growing season. Sow Ornamental Grasses From Seed Very fashionable and extremely versatile, annual grasses are easy to grow from seed, and can be used in wild, meadow-style plantings, as well as container designs. Drought- and Heat-Tolerant Annuals Stock your garden with drought-tolerant annuals that come into their own just as summer starts to sizzle. A Guide to Ornamental Garden Grasses Add color and style to your garden space with this guide to planting ornamental grasses.  Ornamental Grasses for Every Situation Choose the ornamental grass based on the season, the height and the type of soil.
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Grasses For Landscaping

Pinterest How to use ornamental grasses An abundance of grasses ― including golden pheasant’s tail and green Miscanthus transmorrisonensis ― lends softness and movement to this garden, while agaves and other succulents add starchier textures. So how to get started? Learn the difference between good plants and weeds. Browse through nurseries and look through books, such as Landscaping with Ornamental Grasses (Sunset Publishing Corporation, 2002; $15). Then choose varieties of grasses that are appropriate for where you live—some are frost tender, others can be invasive in some areas. Most grasses are sold as container-grown plants in 1- and 5-gallon cans. Click ahead for 10 favorites. See more about this house
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Grasses For Landscaping

How to use ornamental grasses An abundance of grasses ― including golden pheasant’s tail and green Miscanthus transmorrisonensis ― lends softness and movement to this garden, while agaves and other succulents add starchier textures. So how to get started? Learn the difference between good plants and weeds. Browse through nurseries and look through books, such as Landscaping with Ornamental Grasses (Sunset Publishing Corporation, 2002; $15). Then choose varieties of grasses that are appropriate for where you live—some are frost tender, others can be invasive in some areas. Most grasses are sold as container-grown plants in 1- and 5-gallon cans. Click ahead for 10 favorites. See more about this house
grasses for landscaping 4

Grasses For Landscaping

Steven Gunther Pinterest How to use ornamental grasses An abundance of grasses ― including golden pheasant’s tail and green Miscanthus transmorrisonensis ― lends softness and movement to this garden, while agaves and other succulents add starchier textures. So how to get started? Learn the difference between good plants and weeds. Browse through nurseries and look through books, such as Landscaping with Ornamental Grasses (Sunset Publishing Corporation, 2002; $15). Then choose varieties of grasses that are appropriate for where you live—some are frost tender, others can be invasive in some areas. Most grasses are sold as container-grown plants in 1- and 5-gallon cans. Click ahead for 10 favorites. See more about this house
grasses for landscaping 5

Grasses For Landscaping

An abundance of grasses ― including golden pheasant’s tail and green Miscanthus transmorrisonensis ― lends softness and movement to this garden, while agaves and other succulents add starchier textures. So how to get started? Learn the difference between good plants and weeds. Browse through nurseries and look through books, such as Landscaping with Ornamental Grasses (Sunset Publishing Corporation, 2002; $15). Then choose varieties of grasses that are appropriate for where you live—some are frost tender, others can be invasive in some areas. Most grasses are sold as container-grown plants in 1- and 5-gallon cans. Click ahead for 10 favorites. See more about this house
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Grasses For Landscaping

Ornamental grasses deliver a lot of bang for the buck. They introduce exciting textures to the garden, along with movement and even sound as they rustle in the breeze. You can select grasses in nearly any hue, including dark burgundy, steely blue, white and green blends, gold and bronze. Leaves often change colors during the growing season, shifting to rich, deeper shades in autumn, followed by muted winter tones. Grass seedheads can be delicate, but in most cases they command attention and introduce a new element to a planting. Check out a few of our favorite grasses.
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Grasses For Landscaping

Maiden grass cultivars. Not for the faint of heart because these are generally some of our tallest grasses, maiden grasses are among the easiest to grow. They thrive in full sun and average garden soil and are hardy in USDA Zones 4 to 9. Both Miscanthus sinensis ‘Huron Blush’ and ‘Huron Sentinel’ are late-summer flowering grasses.Up to six feet tall, ‘Sentinel’ sports arching green leaves and a narrow white midrib. The large bronze flowers temptingly turn into puffy fawn-colored seedheads the texture of chenille.
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Trying to find ornamental grasses for the garden was a real challenge 25 years ago. Today gardeners use them liberally in the garden — for their low maintenance, ease of growth, long flowering time, few insects and diseases, and ready availability. Now there’s a dramatic and sensational array of grasses for all sorts of landscape uses.
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Panicum virgatum ‘Northwind’. One of my favorites is a relative newcomer among the switch grasses. This is the most compact and upright of all the Panicums. The beautiful yellowish panicles appear in late summer and are held mostly in the center of the clump. This is an extremely fast-growing grass. Unlike many other switch grasses, it remains vertical through the winter; unless it’s grown in significant shade or snow is heavy, ‘Northwind’ never looks like a blown-over haystack. Hardy in USDA Zones 5 to 8.
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Pennisetum alopecuroides. ‘Fox Trot’ and ‘Red Head’ are the shining new stars when it comes to fountain grasses. Both are hardy in USDA Zones 5 to 9. At four to five feet tall, ‘Fox Trot’ has the distinction of being one of the tallest fountain grasses. The smoky, dark plumes appear in late summer, each measuring six to eight inches long, and are attractive for dried arrangements. When the plumes blow gracefully in the wind, it’s easy to see how it got its name.
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For those who love grasses but have only shade to offer, there are also new choices for you. The carexes are technically sedges, but the use is the same. They like partial to full shade and grow best when soils are evenly moist. They aren’t drought tolerant like the sun-loving grasses.
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Add beauty with ornamental grasses Because of their color, texture and movement, ornamental grasses are wonderful additions to our landscapes. Even better, you get all this beauty for little work–once established, just water during drought and cut them back in early spring. And they withstand pests (even deer avoid them). There are many varieties available, so finding one to suit your garden style and growing conditions as well as your taste should be easy. Here are Midwest Living’s picks for Zones 2-7 (that is a wide range, so make sure your selection fits your Zone). Find your Zone here Tags: Gardens, Fall, Summer, Plants, Perennials, Summer gardening, Spring, Spring gardening, Fall gardening
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So how to get started? Learn the difference between good plants and weeds. Browse through nurseries and look through books, such as Landscaping with Ornamental Grasses (Sunset Publishing Corporation, 2002; $15).
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The most popular ornamental grass, feather reedgrass offers a distinct upright habit that looks fantastic all winter long. Like many grasses, this tough plant tolerates a wide range of conditions.
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One of our favorite grasses, switchgrass offers airy plumes in late summer and fall. It looks great during the season, too: Many varieties (such as ‘Dallas Blues’) offer blue-gray foliage during the season and turn brilliant shades of gold or red in autumn.
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One of the most common grasses, maidengrass is big, beautiful, and easy to grow. It offers narrow, arching foliage (many selections are variegated; look for them to add more color to your landscape) and silvery plumes that are enchanting when the light catches them just right.
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Toffee Twist sedge (Carex flagellifera) injects a coppery hue into plantings. Sedges are not true grasses, but you can use them in the landscape just like an ornamental grass. Toffee Twist forms a tidy clump that’s roughly 18 to 24 inches tall and wide. It’s an ideal size for pairing with chunky-leafed perennials, like Jack Frost brunnera and Lenten roses (shown). Breeders report this plant as being hardy in Zones 7 to 10, but gardeners in Zone 5b have consistently reported successful overwintering. Give this sedge rich, well-drained soil in sun to part shade. Trim plants in early spring before new growth begins.

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