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Garden Ideas For Small Space

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Garden Ideas For Small Space

Repurposed Furniture GardenYou can create a beautiful garden area with some old furniture that you are planning to throw out. Old dressers make great planting bases. You simply put the plants in individual pots and then use the drawers to hold them. You end up with a three tiered garden look that is both beautiful and space saving. If you don’t have an old dresser on hand, you can probably pick one up at a yard sale or flea market for just a few dollars and then all you have to do is start planting. Instructions – HouselogicRecycled Upside Down GardenRecycling is a great way to save money and space. This recycled upside down garden idea is perfect for those who live in apartments or you could just hang your plants on the porch if you have one. You just have to choose the containers that you want to use and then follow the instructions to properly hang your plants so that they will grow as they should. This is great for flowers, herbs or many vegetables and is space saving and a really cute way to show off those plants. Instructions – DesignspongeVertical GardenA shoe organizer is a great way to build a vertical garden. Not only does this garden look great and save space, it helps to keep those critters and pets out of your herbs and vegetables. You just have to fill each of the shoe spaces with potting soil or compost and then add your plants. Be sure that you choose a place for your hanger that gets enough sunlight for the plants and if there is protection overhead from rain, you will need to water them occasionally as well. Instructions – InstructablesHanging Gutter GardenOld guttering can be used to create a beautiful hanging garden. The amount of guttering that you will need depends on the size of the garden you want to plant. Gutter gardens allow you to take advantage of the vertical space around your yard so even if you don’t have much of a lawn, you can still grow flowers, herbs and vegetables. Just remember to choose a spot that gets a few hours of direct sunlight each day. Gutter gardens also provide a bit of a natural privacy fence or divider for your garden area. Instructions – GoodshomedesignKitchen Fairy GardenNow, you don’t necessarily have to use the fairies in this garden but the overall idea is a great one for smaller spaces. You will need a container. In this case, an old wooden barrel provides the base for the planting. Once you have a container, you just begin filling it with soil and other smaller containers. Note the muffin pan in this garden which is perfect for smaller herbs. You could also use regular terra cotta pots or just about any type of container. Old pots and pans are great if you want to create the kitchen look. Instructions – OrganizedclutterqueenVertical Pallet GardenAn old pallet – or several if you want – can be turned into the perfect planter for vertical gardens. Even if you have a rather large outside area, vertical planters are great because they save space and they are very attractive to look at. They can add to your current garden area and give you much more space for planting additional flowers, herbs or veggies. You just have to attach your terra cotta pots to the pallets using zip ties or something similarly strong and then choose what you want to plant. Instructions – KellymoorebagKiddie Pool GardenIf you don’t really want to tear up your yard or you have no yard to use, an old plastic kiddie pool provides the perfect raised garden bed. If you want, you could go in and cover the pool with stones or bricks to make it a bit more attractive. You just have to fill the pool with soil or compost and then begin adding your plants. This is great because you can take up the pool during the winter if you want and then put it back when it gets close to planting season again. Instructions – ContainergardeningPortable Container GardenContainer gardens are great because they are portable. If you need to move them, you can and without worrying about regrowing grass over your garden area. If you have a fence or deck, a colorful container garden is a great way to add a little beauty to the area and save space for your planting as well. Choose colorful bucket planters and simply hang them on your fencing or you could even hang them from windowsills and other areas around the home. Instructions – BhgFormed Terra Cotta GardensYou can lay out your garden area and surround it with terra cotta planters to make it more defined. This is a great idea for small garden spaces because it helps you to keep your garden area separate from your lawn. You simply decide the size of the garden that you need and then outline it with terra cotta planters. You can then use the planters to add additional plants to the area. This design works perfectly for vegetable gardens but could be used for a flower garden as well. Instructions – ApartmenttherapyTiered GardenTiered gardens are great for small spaces. If you only have minimal space for flowers or veggies, you can create a great tiered garden from a few terra cotta planters. Once stacked, you can just plant whatever you want in the planters and you have space for as many plants as you want depending on how many planters you use. You could use the plastic planters if you want but the terra cotta ones are a bit sturdier and will hold up for much longer. This is a great garden idea for annuals, particularly if you want something colorful on the porch. Instructions – Krysanthe
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Garden Ideas For Small Space

Choose Your Small-Space AdventureHere are my top suggestions for creating a productive garden within the constraints of whatever space you have to work with:No Space. If you have a large, south-facing window, you can grow herbs and salad greens in pots, containers or a window box. You may also succeed with container-grown crops such as tomatoes and peppers depending on the amount of sun you can provide them. The key to success is picking compact varieties suited to your taste and available space (see “Compact Varieties for Small-Space Growing” near the end of this article).Small Balcony or Patio. In addition to the options above, a person in this category can grow crops that require more sun and vertical space. For example, try growing large pots of strawberries or trellising cucumbers. The most inspiring gardener I know from this category is Mark Ridsdill Smith, who grows more than $1,000 worth of food each year on his 9-by-6-foot balcony and five south-facing window boxes in London (see photo in the Image Gallery).Small Yard. Perhaps choose plants that go well together. For example, you could plant a salad garden (i.e., different varieties of greens and lettuce), a soup garden (i.e., carrots, onions and celery) or a salsa garden (i.e., tomatoes, peppers and cilantro). For people just starting out and those growing in shady conditions, I think a small salad garden consisting of a few varieties of “cut and come again” lettuce varieties or mesclun mixes, one to two favorite herbs and a compact tomato plant or two is a great introduction to the pleasures of the kitchen garden. Leafy greens such as spinach and chard also do well in small, shady plots. (For more on successfully growing food in shady areas, read Best Vegetables to Grow in the Shade)Micro-CompostingAs the urban and suburban homesteading movement grows in strength and numbers, those looking to convert trash to treasure through composting have more options than ever. If you have a small yard or patio, you can look to the newest generation of compact compost tumblers that do everything the big boys do, but in less space and at a lower cost. Apartment and condominium dwellers interested in converting kitchen scraps into compost for containers and window boxes should squirm their way to the closest worm composting bin. The latest models take a lot of the guesswork out of the process and eliminate any odor via their multitiered platforms that keep the worms and finished compost separate from one another. Worm composters are easy to maintain, and they create super-rich fertilizer. (Read more about worm composting in How to Make a Worm Bin.)Compact Varieties for Small-Space GrowingVariety selection is more crucial to small-space gardening than you may think. The amount of space that a particular crop occupies can vary greatly from one variety to another. If you’re gardening in limited space, especially containers, you should be looking for vegetable varieties listed as “compact” or, in the case of fruit trees, “dwarf.”
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Garden Ideas For Small Space

In order to create this effect, however, you need to know how much space to give each plant. Mel Bartholomew’s brilliantly simple tactic is to set a 1-by-1-foot grid onto a garden space and plant crops into the grid. Large crops such as broccoli, peppers and cabbage require a whole square, whereas small ones such as carrots and radishes can be planted 16 to a square. One critical lesson the square-foot gardening technique can teach newbie small-space gardeners is that they may have to put their dreams of squash, watermelons and potatoes on hold. For some, a garden without zucchini isn’t really a garden. However, if faced with the choice of having one bush summer squash plant or one tomato plant, one cabbage, one pepper, one large basil, one broccoli, four lettuces, four chards, 16 carrots and 16 onions (i.e., the number and types of crops you could get out of the same square footage required for one squash plant), you would really have to love zucchini bread to choose the former. Books such as Jeavons’ and Bartholomew’s can be invaluable for making planting decisions like these. For those looking for a more modern tool for deciding what to plant where and in what quantity, there are some excellent online garden planners available that allow you to sketch out your garden on your computer screen and drag and drop crops onto your layout. I think the best one so far is MOTHER’s interactive, easy-to-use Vegetable Garden Planner.One last thing to keep in mind about an intensively planted, geometric layout versus a row layout is that you won’t walk between your crops but rather will reach into them. So, unless you happen to have the arm span of an orangutan, your beds shouldn’t be wider than 3 or 4 feet. The length depends on the space you have and the amount of food you want to grow. Mel Bartholomew recommends building wooden boxes for your beds, but you can get the same benefits by forming and planting into boxless, level mounds. Go Vertical, BabyOne cool technique for increasing your choices and your harvests in a small-space garden is vertical growing, which some people refer to as cubed-foot gardening. As you can guess, it’s about understanding and fully exploiting the vertical space plants can occupy. I’ve seen this technique applied — or, more accurately, misapplied — in my own garden. My family and I rented our house and garden for a year to some lovely, well-meaning tenants who were eager to scratch at the dirt and decided to plant sunflowers in the southern part of our backyard garden. The plants thrived, reaching heights up to 9 feet, but the sun-starved squash planted behind them were not nearly as happy. The first rule of vertical growing is knowing the heights of plants and situating the tallest ones in the northern part of your garden so as not to shade out the pipsqueaks. A more advanced lesson is learning the vertical space a crop is willing to occupy if coaxed and supported. While sunflowers shoot skyward without any cheerleading, crops such as tomatoes, cucumbers and even melons are willing to grow upward if trellised and shown the way. Understanding these three dimensions of gardening will allow you to harvest more from each precious square foot of soil. (Learn more about vertical gardening in Vertical Gardening Techniques for Maximum Returns.)

Garden Ideas For Small Space

Garden Ideas For Small Space
Garden Ideas For Small Space
Garden Ideas For Small Space
Garden Ideas For Small Space

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