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Design Light Consortium

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Design Light Consortium

In part one of our series on energy labels and certifications, we focused on the EPA Energy Star label and how it serves as a consumer product differentiator across a wide array of energy efficient technologies. While some products are identified by their Energy Star certification for residential and light commercial compliance, others stand apart for their DLC accreditation and are important for compliance with utility and government sponsored funding programs for commercial and industrial applications. Maybe not as well known, the DesignLight Consortium (DLC) label is a valuable and hard-to-achieve stamp of approval sought after by many manufacturers within the lighting industry – but what’s the real difference between the two? The DLC Formed in 1998, the DLC has become a major source of information for contractors, lighting distributors, utility companies, and energy rebate programs across the United States and Canada. Focused on efficient lighting products and practices in commercial buildings, the DEC was formed as a regional group in cooperation with the Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP) and initially concentrated its efforts on the Northeast and Midwest areas. The DLC provides a central place for all commercial lighting manufacturers to submit their products with 3rd party testing for evaluation against all state and utility standards across the United States and Canada. If their product meets the DLC standards and requirements, it becomes part of their Solid State Lighting Qualified Products List (maybe add a link here). DLC welcomes state, regional, and utility energy efficiency programs in the United States and Canada to become members of the consortium. Currently, 85 members from 35 states and 5 Canadian provinces provide expertise and insight into policy and specification development related to quality, performance, and energy efficiency. The members then utilize DLC’s resources to improve their own programs, meet energy goals, and provide product quality assurance to their customers. The DLC Solid State Lighting Qualified Products List In 2008, Energy Star (along with the DOE Solid State Lighting team), created a qualification process for consumer-focused LED lighting products. Following the success of this list, it became apparent that a similar resource was need for commercial-grade LED lights. That gap was filled with the DLC Solid State Lighting Qualified Products List (QPL). It takes considerable effort to get on the QPL. To make this list, LED lighting products must meet strict requirements related to lighting output, luminaire efficacy, power factor, color temperature, and rated lifetime. The DLC rates these lighting products based on quality and energy efficiency and the products are tested by independent third party labs to determine qualifications. The QPL is used throughout both the United States and Canada to establish energy efficiency program standards and rebates. Currently, the QPL contains over 250,000 luminaries from more than 1500 manufactures and continues to expand every month. EnergyStar vs. DLC Both Energy Star and the DLC promote energy efficiency and customer confidence in LED products, but they are different – Energy Star rates consumer (residential) products and the DLC rates commercial products. You won’t see both an Energy Star and DLC label on the same bulb. Each organization maintains a distinct QPL related to that industry’s product needs. There is occasional crossover between product categories, but the government sponsored Energy Star has the right to put “dibs” on any category. If EnergyStar decides to cover a certain lighting category that the DLC currently lists, they have 270 days to drop it. There’s talk of both entities working together to create a combined residential-commercial QPL, but so far that hasn’t happened. The DesignLight Consortium drives energy efficiency in the commercial sector and is the qualification standard for many utility rebate programs. It’s a trusted resource for information and like the Energy Star, it stands for high quality, environmentally friendly lighting products. EarthTronics has over 90 products that meet the DLC qualification standards and are listed the QPL. Feel confident knowing that EarthTronics has earned the DLC label. Our Earthbulbs have been put the to the test – and passed with flying colors. Check out a complete listing of EarthTronics’ products on the DLC QPL here.
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Design Light Consortium

Bringing Efficiency to Light. The DesignLights Consortium® (DLC) is a non-profit organization dedicated to accelerating the widespread adoption of high-performing commercial lighting solutions. The DLC promotes high-quality, energy-efficient lighting products in collaboration with utilities and energy efficiency program members, manufacturers, lighting designers, and federal, state, and local entities. Through these partnerships, the DLC establishes product quality specifications, facilitates thought leadership, and provides information, education, tools and technical expertise.

Design Light Consortium

The DesignLights Consortium™ promotes quality, performance and energy efficient commercial sector lighting solutions through collaboration among its federal, regional, state, utility, and energy efficiency program members, luminaire manufacturers, lighting designers, and other industry stakeholders throughout the US and Canada. The DLC is a project of Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP), a regional non-profit which has been bringing stakeholders together since 1996 to accelerate efficiency solutions to create lasting change in the marketplace.
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Design Light Consortium

The DesignLights Consortium™ (DLC) is a project of Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (NEEP), a regional non-profit founded in 1996 whose mission is to serve the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic to accelerate energy efficiency in the building sector through public policy, program strategies and education. The DLC promotes quality, performance and energy efficient commercial sector lighting solutions through collaboration among its federal, regional, state, utility, and energy efficiency program members; luminaire manufacturers; lighting designers and other industry stakeholders throughout the U.S. and Canada.
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Design Light Consortium

In 2010, NEEP launched the DesignLights Consortium™ Qualified Products List of commercial grade LED luminaires. Within a few months, programs from beyond the NEEP region asked to participate in the effort as DLC members and to use the resource. Today DLC members include utility, state and regional energy efficiency programs from over 30 states in the U.S. and three Canadian provinces. As of December 2012, the list contained over 18,000 luminaires from more than 250 manufacturers and continues to grow. To date, the DLC provides a platform for collaboration among energy efficiency program members and drives the lighting market towards innovation by providing information, education, tools and technical expertise for cutting edge technologies.
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Design Light Consortium

The DesignLights Consortium® (DLC) is a non-profit organization dedicated to accelerating the widespread adoption of high-performing commercial lighting solutions. The DLC promotes high-quality, energy-efficient lighting products in collaboration with utilities and energy efficiency program members, manufacturers, lighting designers, and federal, state, and local entities. Through these partnerships, the DLC establishes product quality specifications, facilitates thought leadership, and provides information, education, tools and technical expertise.
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Design Light Consortium

DLC welcomes state, regional, and utility energy efficiency programs in the United States and Canada to become members of the consortium. Currently, 85 members from 35 states and 5 Canadian provinces provide expertise and insight into policy and specification development related to quality, performance, and energy efficiency. The members then utilize DLC’s resources to improve their own programs, meet energy goals, and provide product quality assurance to their customers.
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Design Light Consortium

The DesignLight Consortium drives energy efficiency in the commercial sector and is the qualification standard for many utility rebate programs. It’s a trusted resource for information and like the Energy Star, it stands for high quality, environmentally friendly lighting products.
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IES TM-30-15 is a document approved by the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) that describes a method for evaluating light source color rendition. The method encompasses several individual measures and graphics that complement one another and provide a comprehensive characterization of how the light will affect the color appearance of objects. The three highest-level components of the system are the Fidelity Index (Rf), Gamut Index (Rg), and the Color Vector Graphic.
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In Technical Requirements Table V4.2, non-cutoff and semi-cutoff wallpacks are eligible under this Primary Use designation, distinct from full-cutoff wallpacks. For non-cutoff and semi-cutoff wallpacks, light output, efficacy, and zonal lumen distribution requirements are evaluated based on the lumens in the 0-90° zone only, rather than total lumens produced by the luminaire. This means: the lumen output for these products must be ≥300 lm in the 0-90° zone; the “efficacy” calculations will include only lumens in the 0-90° zone and divide those by the total wattage; and the zonal lumen requirement of ≤10% light output in the 80-90° glare zone will be calculated by dividing the lumens in that zone by the lumen total in the 0-90° zone.
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NEEP began the DLC commercial lighting initiative in 1998. The initial working group was made up of energy efficiency program managers who recognized that many energy efficiency projects fall short on lighting quality. Knowing that, the DLC project developed the knowhow series™ , a set of lighting design guides for individual commercial spaces such as office, retail, and warehouse, aimed at electrical contractors and lighting equipment distributors. The guides highlighted up-to-date and efficient equipment, best design practices and codes and standards for commercial lighting. The knowhow series™ was embraced by architects and engineers alike, as an instructional tool to promote services and to distinguish themselves against their competitors. The DLC guides were widely used, until advanced building energy codes and new equipment innovations rendered them obsolete.

Bringing efficiency to light. The DLC® is a non-profit organization whose mission is to drive efficient lighting by defining quality, facilitating thought leadership, and delivering tools and resources to the lighting market through open dialogue and collaboration. Learn more NOTE: Due to unforeseen complications with the DLC server update, the SSL QPL is currently displaying inaccurate listing statuses. We are actively working on repairs and expect the list to be displaying accurate product data again by May 4. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience. Download the static QPL here until the online QPL is displaying accurate data.

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11 Photos of the "Design Light Consortium"

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